We all like to know what’s trending, whether it’s fashion or film, streaming media or music. And, of course, food.

Google recently released its 2017 list of most searched items in a variety of categories–from people and global news to actors, elections, and songs/lyrics. It’s really fascinating. In fact, the number one search among all categories was Hurricane Irma. The top “how to”? How to make slime. Go figure.

One of the categories is recipes. Here you’ll have not only the top 10 recipes searched but also their links. Since we figure you like to be on trend, here’s a look at what people globally wanted to learn how to make:

1) Chicken breast recipe
2) Ground beef recipe
3) Poğaça tarifi (Turkish bread recipe)
4) French toast recipe
5) Kek tarifi (cake recipe)
6) Pork chop recipe
7) Spaghetti squash recipe
8) Coleslaw recipe
9) Pesto recipe
10) 餃子 レシピ (Dumpling recipe)

Let’s look at a couple of the recipes to get some insight into what was going on. For the chicken breast recipe, the greatest interest came from Canadians. That was followed by the United Arab Emirates and Singapore. The U.S. only came in at the fourth position, followed by New Zealand. Related to searching for your basic chicken breast recipe was searching for air fryer chicken breast recipes, followed by–of course–recipes for instant pot chicken breast recipes, then (surprisingly) airline chicken breast recipes, and finally in the top five, sous vide chicken breast recipes (four and five were the same, just worded slightly differently).

Canadians must be great recipe searchers because they were the top searchers for ground beef recipes, followed by the U.S. For Turkish bread, don’t get cocky–it wasn’t Turks; it was us! Jamaicans were the most interested in French toast. Filipinos were all over pork chops. Canadians, again, were most interested in spaghetti squash. Americans (!) were most curious about coleslaw recipes, but get this, Malta has the most interest in pesto recipes. American’s didn’t even make the top five. There wasn’t any info given for the cake or dumpling recipe searches.

Now what can you do with this knowledge? Well, it’s something to keep in mind as you’re menu planning, of course. Chicken breasts and ground beef are food items that are versatile and relatively inexpensive. Spaghetti squash is obviously a great substitute for pasta. Coleslaw is fast and easy to make and pretty inexpensive, too.

And pork chops… oh, pork chops. Pork chops are the only food that’s on Google’s list of most searched-for recipes in the world and list of most-searched for recipes in the U.S. Pork chops also made the list in 2016.

Pork Porterhouse Pork Chop with Garlic Sage Compound Butter

With that in mind, here’s my favorite way of making pork chops. This is a one-pound Pork Porterhouse Pork Chop with Garlic Sage Compound Butter that serves two. I buy these from a butcher because supermarkets generally wouldn’t carry these thickly marbled chops. The process is extremely easy. All I do is grill it on my stove top.

It begins with a 24-hour brining. I used a simple brine inspired by Chef Anne Burrell that includes kosher salt, fresh sage leaves, crushed garlic, sugar, and a bay leaf mixed in a quart of water. Stir it up, add the chop, cover, and refrigerate.

At some point between brining and cooking you can make a simple compound butter to add even more richness to the dish. Because my brine includes sage leaves from my garden, I stick with the flavor profile and make a compound butter with minced sage leaves, diced red onion, garlic, and sea salt. All you need to do is leave a stick of butter out until it’s room temperature, slice off about a tablespoon and melt that in a small saucepan.

Add the sage, red onion, garlic, and sea salt, and sauté gently until it’s just cooked through, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and place the mixture in a small bowl. Let cool for 15 to 20 minutes. Then slice the rest of the butter, add the slices to the bowl, and thoroughly mix all the ingredients with a fork. Pull out a piece of wax paper or plastic wrap and place the butter mixture on it. Shape into a small log about an inch thick. Then fold the paper or wrap over the log and roll it a bit until it’s evenly shaped. Then fold up the rest around the log and refrigerate it at least an hour so that it’s firm (you can also make it a couple of days before). Remove it from the refrigerator before you begin cooking the chop.

When you plan to cook the chop, remove it from the brine and pat it down to remove the excess moisture. I also trim off much of the fat cap. Slather the chop in olive oil and, as Burrell suggests, sprinkle the meat with crushed red pepper flakes. Heat a cast iron skillet and when it’s good and hot, place the chop in the skillet and cover with a splatter guard.

Cook for four to five minutes on each side until the internal temperature is about 145° and then hold the chop vertically with a pair of tongs to grill the edge of fat. That’ll take about a minute. Remove from the skillet and let it rest. You should have a chop cooked medium rare.

Cut the meat off the bone and slice it. (Save the bone to gnaw on secretly later.) Place the slices on the cooked mustard and top with a couple of slices of the compound butter.

Are any of these among your top recipe searches? What is your favorite item on this list?

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Caron Golden

About 

Founder of premier organization of personal chefs inspires students to follow their dreams of culinary entrepreneurship.

Candy Wallace, executive director of the American Personal & Private Chef Association (APPCA), today was recognized by Sullivan University’s National Center for Hospitality Studies as its 33rd Distinguished Guest Chef.

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