Chef Samone Lett is the owner of Atlanta’s Wishful Concepts Catering & Personal Chef Services. She’s an APPCA member and I’m captivated by her tweets. Always looking to feature our fabulous members, I reached out to Samone to ask if she’d be interested in telling her story. It’s a fascinating one, as you’ll read below. We have such remarkable members!

It is hard to recount my journey from a homeless young woman following culinary school  to a successful chef. So, I’ll start from my beginning. As a small girl in Brooklyn, New York, I used to watch celebrities like Emeril Lagasse, Bobby Flay, and Jamie Oliver on the Food Network and prayed to God to give me a chance to be on this show as a contestant. Never in my wildest imagination did I see myself as a big chef hosting my own show on television. It’s still an aspiration!

But by God’s grace, my hard work and struggle has paid off and today I am a successful chef.

 

I was passionate about cooking as a small child. My father and grandmother taught me how to cook when I was nine, and I continued in the military, when at age 18 I enlisted into the U.S. Army as a Food Specialist and eventually was stationed in Germany. There I was exposed to kitchen management, food service, and cooking for large quantities of people. I later studied the intricacies of this profession at a culinary school. I studied Hospitality Management & Tourism and also graduated from Le Cordon Bleu with a degree in Culinary Arts. After graduating culinary school I took my chef bag began to aggressively pursue personal and private chef jobs. I had a set back in 2004, a year after my graduation, when I ended up homeless. My previous marriage, clients, and business fell apart and I was in a season of instability. I later wrote about it in my spiritual memoir, Lily In The Valley, published in 2007. After remarrying in 2010 the road to rebuilding Wishful Concepts Catering began and I was inspired to focus on my passion for culinary arts full-time.

I also worked in some restaurants in Orlando, but never felt satisfied as I had no direct interaction with guests. I could not know what they thought about the food I made for them. This was why I started my own catering business. I was hooked to the idea of becoming a personal chef given to me by Chef Candy. I relished the idea of running private events.

I worked under a few chefs for some time in Orlando. Wedding planner Michelle loved my work and mentored me to learn the finer details of this business. I learned how to set up a buffet and other plate events from her and still use her ideas in running my own company.

Salient highlights of my career

  • Our company focuses on customer experience and provides friendly services.
  • Besides being a chef, I have a passion to help other women in finding their identity and direction.
  • I have written five self-help books. Lily in the Valley is my autobiography.
  • I have worked hard to find a place in this male-dominated industry. Being a female chef, I also faced lots of discrimination.
  • My company has won Best Wedding award six times in a row from The Knot and have two Couples Choice awards from the Wedding Wire.
  • We are supplying food to the crew on the sets of movies.

My experiences as a contestant on Food Network

Food Network is the most popular channel among food lovers. I always admired this show and the judges who evaluated the dishes made by the contestants. I applied to become a contestant by sending my latest pictures. I was thrilled to pieces when I got an invitation in two weeks’ time. I underwent a tough interview process and was finally selected to be a contestant on Cooks vs. Cons, which aired in August 2017. This is a show where ordinary cooks are pitted against professional chefs with their identities concealed until the show has been completed and it is time to declare the winner.

The name of my episode was Not Your Mother’s Meatloaf. Contestants had to prepare a meatloaf in just 30 minutes, although it takes nearly 45 minutes for this job. It was a highly intense and stressful event where I knew my actions were being filmed and telecast live as I prepared a dish. There were no retakes or time to rectify mistakes and I had to get it right in whatever time I got. It was really tough to keep smiling and listening to the remarks of the men behind the cameras while preparing my dish. Cooking under the pressure of a time limit and in front of the judges was really very tough.

Not being able to stay in touch with family and friends for a long time was also a hard experience for me. But, the nerve wracking experience as a contestant on Cooks vs. Cons helped me in my preparation for the next show, Food Network Star. It was a once in a lifetime experience. It was definitely amazing to meet Chef Carla Hall, Chef Geoffrey Zakarian, and food author and TV host Daphne Oz! I had loads of fun and received love and warmth from the staff and the crew members of this show. They liked me so much that I was again called by Food Network to participate in Food Network Star. I could not believe my luck when I received the call from the channel for this show. I was on Season 14, which aired in Spring 2018. I thank my stars for finally getting recognition for my work as a chef.

Today, business is good and I’m currently focusing on personal chef services as we just moved to Atlanta. No matter what I’ve endured on my journey as a chef and business owner, my faith has consistently provided the resources and people I needed. I share my story from a perspective of showing others that anyone can fulfill their purpose in the midst of challenges and obstacles.

Nicole Gaffney

This time last year, every Sunday night for several weeks I, along with APPCA chefs across the country, watched Food Network Star with a vested interest. One of our own was in the competition. Every week, APPCA member Nicole Gaffney undertook a grueling challenge and she outlasted almost all the competition. No, she didn’t win but she made it to the finals and made us proud.

So, I thought it would interesting to check in with Nicole a year later and find out how that experience impacted her life and career. I was moved by Nicole’s personal and professional growth, as was Candy Wallace, APPCA’s founder and executive director.

“This career path was designed to be a personal chef “umbrella” under which the owner operator develops and offers services and skills that represent the chef/owner’s own level of expertise and personal preferences and specialties. No two personal chef businesses should look alike. And the process of operating a personal chef business is in a constant state of evolution,” said Candy.

“Nicole’s evolution is profound and we are not only proud of her journey but also excited for her since she is at a point in her journey, post-food TV, that she has taken a good hard look at her life and experiences thus far and has re-prioritized her needs, her truths, and her goals.

“Reading this interview,” Candy added, “reconfirmed my commitment to continue to provide training and support for individuals who choose to build a culinary career that reflects who they are, what they need to provide for themselves and their loved ones, and where they choose to go on their professional and personal journey.”

Stomping the grapes

APPCA: How has your life changed a year after your run on Food Network Star?

Nicole Gaffney: It’s changed a lot and also is still very much the same. I have a brand new kitchen – so that has changed the way I cook and interact with food, as my old kitchen was cramped and uninspiring. My career path has changed, which I’ll elaborate on in the next question. But mostly, my attitude has changed. I went in to FNS knowing completely who I was, and feeling really confident in that. But after the show had ended, I didn’t know which way was up. Full disclosure: I had accepted my loss and was able to put it in perspective on the surface, but deep down I was devastated. I put my heart and soul (not to mention my life on hold) into a competition I had dreamt about entering since I was a kid. So having made it all the way to the end, and then coming out of it with essentially nothing was heartbreaking. This past year I experienced a lot of growing pains as a result, but I’m happy to say I’ve come out of that funk and feel a lot better about who I am and where I’m at in my life.

APPCA: How has your business changed? Are you still a personal chef? Are you still teaching?

NG: I’m no longer working as a personal chef. As much as I loved my clients, and loved running my business for five years, I began to feel like it was holding me back from pursuing what I really wanted out of life. I felt creatively stifled by the restrictions each client had in their diet, and rather than creating food that made me excited, I was expending all of my energy problem solving on their behalf. I was providing them with a valuable service and it was paying the bills, but I started to feel like I had hit a wall. I always felt much more gratified when I taught someone to cook as opposed to when I just cooked the food for them. I am still teaching through a few different local cooking schools, demos at food festivals, on my blog and YouTube channel. I have my hand in a lot of different pots right now and am working on monetizing the most time-consuming ones.

APPCA: Are you watching the current season? What are you looking at when viewing? Are you “virtually coaching” contestants based on your experience with the mentors or with challenges?

On Rachael Ray

NG: I’m actually not! My husband and I made the decision to get rid of our cable around Memorial Day weekend in order to save a little (actually, a lot) of money, but mostly to inspire us to get out and enjoy the summer. It feels really pretentious and hippie-ish to talk about, but I’ve been really happy with our decision. We’ve been spending more quality time together with our family and friends, have been taking sunset paddles on our paddle boards every night, I’ve been learning the ukulele, keeping up with my garden and reading a lot more. I did watch the first episode online, and it brought back a lot of uneasy memories. I have to say I’m rooting for Jay – he’s a Baton Rouge guy, and I have a lot of love for that city (LSU – geaux Tigers!).

APPCA: What opportunities have you gotten as a result of being on the show?

NG: I think the biggest opportunity for me has been the overall name I’ve made for myself and the fanbase I’ve built online. It’s propelled me to be able to grow my blog and my YouTube channel with far more ease than it would have otherwise, and gives me instant credibility to brands and networks.

APPCA: Are you still connected to Food Network? Are you still in touch with some of the people you got to know on the show?

NG: I’m not still connected to Food Network. Unless I become super successful in one of my ventures, then they are contractually entitled to a piece of it. I have stayed in touch with Bobby Flay a bit, he has been very good to me in terms of encouragement to keep pursuing my dream. My other cast mates and I have all stayed in touch with the exception of Lenny. No one has been able to get a hold of him since the last time we were all together for the finale.

APPCA: Are you doing TV?

NG: Yes! I still host a local Philadelphia-based TV show called The Chef’s Kitchen where I get to cook in the kitchen with some amazing chefs. I also will be starting to represent a few different sustainable seafood products on QVC very soon, possibly as early as next week. I also post weekly quick cooking videos to my YouTube channel, Coley Cooks. I’ve found that my husband and I are not alone in the quest to do away with cable tv, and YouTube and self-created online content are very much the way of the future.

Reese's Pieces

APPCA: Now that a year has passed, what do you think you learned about yourself and what you want in your career and life following what was certainly a life-changing experience?

NG: I think my biggest lesson in all of this is to care much less what people think of me. Being a young personal chef, I was always so concerned with keeping up appearances, staying PC, not wanting to offend anyone, and being seen as trustworthy, professional, and polished. I used to get really upset over any negative criticism I received online or anytime I would lose a follower. I would try to think about what I did or said that made someone dislike me, and then try not to ever do that again. I realized through this whole process that it is impossible to win over 100% of the population and I will not be everyone’s cup of tea. I learned to stay truly authentic to myself, and at times that means being opinionated, super sarcastic, having a potty mouth, and just generally being weird. I stopped being so concerned with having to uphold this perfect persona in order to maintain a business that focused on people pleasing. At the end of the day, the people who do like me will appreciate it, and those who don’t… well, I stopped worrying about them.

teaching

In terms of what I want out of life and my career, I mostly stopped being a personal chef because trying to maintain my business while pursuing these new ventures was detrimental to both. I was spread too thin and my clients always took precedence over anything else. They owned me, and my loyalty to them caused me to miss out on some really neat opportunities. The transition hasn’t been an easy one, but nothing worthwhile ever is. My goal continues to be teaching. It is my mission to boost confidence in home cooks, and to inspire them to cook as locally, seasonally and sustainably as possible. I believe that if you give a man a fish, you feed him for a day, but if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime. I’m not quite sure where this path will lead me, but I’ve learned to be much more excited about the journey than the final destination.

Guest post by APPCA member Nicole Gaffney:

Nicole with clams

Christmas Eve in our family is a big deal, unlike Christmas Day, when we lazily lounge around in our PJ’s all day. Each year there’s a huge Christmas Eve party with my extended Italian relatives from my Mom’s side. Each of my maternal grandparents came from a family of 13 siblings, so the amount of aunts, uncles and cousins will make your head explode. And of course, at the center of our gathering each year, is the food.

The vast majority of my family members made their living as commercial fishermen, so I never really thought twice about how most of the food on our table was seafood. When I got older, I learned about the Italian tradition of The Feast of The Seven Fishes and realized that our seafood-centric celebration was not just a coincidence.  I suppose having family in the business just makes it a little easier to pull off.

This tradition of eating seafood on Christmas Eve evolved from the Roman Catholic custom of abstaining from the consumption of meat products on holy days, much like during Lent. Many families, like my own, follow the tradition simply for the fun and deliciousness of it.

grilled fish

There are many traditional dishes served at The Feast of Seven Fishes, such as octopus salad, baccala (salt cod), fried smelts, stuffed shrimp, clams, and scallops. But to host a celebration of your own, any of your favorite fish dishes will do. The key to a successful spread is making sure you have the freshest seafood possible and not to overcook it.

Clams

Here are some of my family’s best tips for selecting and cooking seafood:

  • First and foremost, have a good, trustworthy fishmonger. Get to know them, and ask their opinion on what is best that day or time of year.
  • The flesh of fresh fish should look vibrant and firm, never dull and mushy. If buying fish whole, always look at the eyes and gills. The eyes should be ultra clear and slightly protruded, while the gills should be bright pink. An old fish will have cloudy, dull sunken eyes and grayish gills. Avoid this at all costs.
  • Ask your fish monger to filet and skin a whole fish for you; they should do it at no additional cost. This way you can select the freshest fish possible without having to wrestle with it at home.
  • Fresh fish begins to deteriorate quickly after its caught, so purchase as last minute as possible, and always store it on ice. It’s best to place the fish on ice in a perforated container over top of another container so the water can drain out, as you don’t want the fish sitting around in the water.
  • Choose bivalves like clams, oysters and mussels that are tightly closed. If some of them are slightly opened, give them a little tap. If they’re alive, they will snap right shut. If not, it means they are dead and should be discarded (or not purchased in the first place).
  • If access to a good fishmonger and fresh seafood is difficult, frozen seafood can be a great option, especially when planning ahead. Cold water fish spend their lives in near freezing temperatures, so freezing them doesn’t affect their flesh much at all. Alaskan king crab, snow crab, shrimp, and lobster tails are often flash frozen right on the boats, so they’re just as good as buying fresh. Always look for the words “vacuum sealed” or “flash frozen” when purchasing frozen seafood.
  • Defrost frozen seafood gradually – overnight in the refrigerator is best, or under cold running water. Never run under hot water, never leave at room temperature, and never ever microwave.
  • Ask your fishmonger if they have any leftover shrimp, crab, or lobster shells they can either give or sell you on the cheap. You can use these to make an incredibly flavorful soup or stock to use in pasta or risotto. I save my shells all year long and take them out at Christmas time to make the most delicious bisque. I love being able to utilize what would have been waste in order to make a luxurious and elegant soup.
  • To freeze shells properly, be sure to clean them thoroughly of all guts and remnants of meat. Dry them off and store in doubled plastic ziplock bags with as much air removed as possible.
  • When cooking fresh lobsters and clams, it’s best to pop them in the freezer for about 20 minutes (but no longer) prior to cooking. For clams, it helps them to open easier, while for lobsters, it temporarily paralyzes them making it much easier to get them into the pot. The same tip also works for opening raw oysters – a few minutes in the freezer will get them to pop open with ease.

 

lobster meat

Whether you opt for one fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish, all 7 fishes or no fish this Christmas, the important thing is to enjoy it with the ones you love.

From my big Italian family to yours, we wish you a very happy, healthy, and whole holiday season.

New Jersey resident Nicole Gaffney is a chef, writer, and television personality best known for being second runner up on the 10th season of the reality cooking competition, Food Network Star. She runs a personal chef business called The Dinner Belle and is the author of the blog, Too Full for School.

Photos courtesy of Nicole Gaffney

Nicole Gaffney

We’re all a little too aware of the way personal chefs have been portrayed on reality food shows. The producers have long had a habit of selecting wackadoodle folks who have nothing in common with the craft and career path we’ve honed. So, when we learned that APPCA member Nicole Gaffney was selected as a finalist of Food Network Star, we knew that finally we’d be well represented to the public.

Nicole didn’t let us down. Indeed, she did us proud. On Sunday night we watched the finale with bated breath, hoping that as one of the three finalists in this long road she’d prove the winner. Unfortunately, viewers–in all their wisdom–selected cowboy Lenny.

On Rachael Ray

In our eyes, though, Nicole is truly a winner–and she knows it, too. Out of tens of thousands of applicants she was selected to compete. She made some gaffes (who didn’t!), but she learned from them. And, she was a trouper. Remember Episode 3’s Cutthroat Kitchen challenge when she got a spice grinder to grind her meat for spaghetti and meatballs and then, in the middle of making her dish, she was sent to stomp grapes? Who else could channel Lucy Ricardo and turn grape stomping into a charming comedic routine? That was our Nicole!

Stomping the grapes

“You have to be slightly insane to do a competition like this,” she laughed back then.

In that same episode, she came out of whatever shell they judges felt she’d been locked in and helped create a zany Hershey’s commercial selling Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, trilling her Spanish R’s like a nut in her blue poncho–and helped win the challenge.

Reese's Pieces

Nicole’s Coastal Cuisine point of view (our Jersey girl “Food Network Star de la Mare”) was consistent, week after week. Okay, she had to get over her self-acknowledged “resting bitch face,” and find her bubbly side. And she did. She came to be at ease in front of the camera. The turning point came in week six, when Giada told her to just let go and stop being wound up so tight. “Be who you want to be.”

Green screen dreams

That was what she told call-in viewer Traci from New Jersey on finale night. “When Giada told me I was wound up too tight, I realized I needed to relax.”

Presentation counts for a lot, clearly, on a television show. But the food can’t fail. And in every challenge, Nicole’s food was praised by the mentors. They loved her food from the first–from her sesame-crusted tuna with spicy soy glaze that was her introduction to us, her couscous salad that chef Alex Guarnaschelli had to follow her on, her spicy pork kabobs with pineapple that she demoed at Knott’s Berry Farm, her fried frogs legs with spicy tamarind glaze and cucumber mango slaw along with her desconstructed s’mores dessert in Las Vegas, and even her spicy shrimp and vegetable lettuce wraps–even though it wasn’t a hit with the little kids. Okay, there was that brush up over prosciutto versus serrano ham–but let’s just let that go…

Vegas pool party

When Bob opened that first red envelope on finale night and it turned out that Nicole had hit third place, you could see the disappointment on the part of the judges and Susie, who told her, “I’ve always thought the world of you and just seeing you today so elegant and such a lovely person… It would have been a pleasure to have you join this family.”

With Robert Irvine

Bobby Flay told Nicole that she had a natural ability to be on camera. “I was rooting for you all the way. This is just a bump in the road to your success.”

And here Nicole showed all the class she’s demonstrated throughout the competition. “It’s been a huge dream of mine. It was life changing. I’ve grown so much as a person and learned so much about myself. Maybe I’ll get to be on TV someday.”

Ronnybrook Milk Bar

Nicole, no doubt your dreams will be realized. But whatever you do and whatever path you take, you’ve already shown the world what a real personal chef can do and be. You’ve been one of the best ambassadors for our career that we could dream of. Bobby’s right. This is just a bump in the road. Your journey is just beginning and there are great things in store for you! We will avidly be reading your blog Too Full for School to learn what’s up next!

#teamNicole

What did you think of Nicole’s run on Food Network Star? Is there a cooking show you want to audition for?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

Chef Nancy Cordi

Temecula, Calif., has long been farm country. And where there are farms there’s bound to be good food, especially in Southern California, where the weather and crops take a page from the climate of the Mediterranean. Nancy Cordi, who grew up north of Temecula, just outside of L.A. in Torrance, comes from a Middle Eastern family. “I was born and raised around happy, beautiful people who surrounded themselves with laughter and, of course, fantastic cooking,” she says. “I was always drawn to cooking at a young age and as I got older, I wanted to carry on the traditions of Middle Eastern cooking, which later evolved into Mediterranean foods.”

Nancy found that many countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea use quality, healthy ingredients in their foods, bringing life into their dishes without masking the flavors. Since she couldn’t travel as often as she’d like, she decided to bring the Mediterranean to California, focusing on the foods of Greece, Lebanon, Israel, and Italy.

Like many people who found their way into life as a personal chef, Nancy originally was working the traditional 40-hour-a-week corporate job and catering on the side. That lasted for about five years. Then less than a year ago, she and her husband Edouard relocated to Temecula. After 21 years of corporate life, Nancy liberated herself and dove into cooking full time, “proudly becoming a certified personal chef through the APPCA,” she says. Her new business is Mediterranea, a Personal and Private Chef Service.

“This catapulted me to a whole new level,” she marvels. “Within a year I have gone from personal chef to also being the chef at a shop where I prepare fresh, healthy, grab-n-go lunches in their kitchen. I am now specializing in vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, and paleo diets, all with that fantastic Mediterranean flare! I’m finally living the dream of making a positive impact on people’s lives by creating dishes using fresh local produce and focusing on reducing sodium levels while keeping my food vibrant and healthy by eliminating preservatives as well.

“I’m very thankful to the APPCA for offering this opportunity to become certified and giving me the boost I needed to take my skills to the next level. I’m a blessed woman and now proud chef!”

Nancy has given us a couple of refreshing summer recipes to share here for her Stuffed Grape Leaves and Classic Middle Eastern Hummus:

Nancy Cordi's Grape Leaf Lunch

Stuffed Grape Leaves

Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Yield: About 50 pieces

Ingredients

50-60 fresh grape leaves or 1 16-ounce jar of brined grape leaves (Note: brined grape leaves are packed by weight so the quantity will vary from jar to jar.)

1 cup olive oil, divided into 1/2 cups
1 1/2 cups uncooked long-grain rice
1 cup dried garbanzo beans
1/2 cup julienne sun-dried tomatoes
2 tablespoons dried mint
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon garlic powder
Juice of two lemons

Preparation

Soak  garbanzo beans in salted water overnight or simmer beans for 1 1/2 hours until they are twice their size. They must be soft and tender before draining.

Rinse brined leaves well to remove brine and set aside.

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1/2 cup olive oil. Add rice, garbanzo beans, sun-dried tomatoes, cumin, mint, salt, garlic powder and juice of 1 lemon. Stir for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and allow the filling to cool.

Line the bottom of a heavy saucepan with 2 or 3 grape leaves, using the broken or torn ones for this.

Rolling the grape leaves: Place a leaf with the stem towards you on a flat surface. The underside of the leaf, with the raised veins, should be face up. Using the point of a sharp paring knife, cut out the stem of the leaf. Overlap the bottom 2 sections of the leaf toward the center.

Place a tablespoon of filling in the bottom center of the leaf, just above where the stem was. Fold the bottom section up to cover the filling. Fold in the sides toward the center. Continue rolling the packet upwards toward the top of the leaf.

Place the rolls in layers in the saucepan, seam side down. Pour the remaining 1/2 cup of olive oil over the grape leaves and enough water to cover them by an inch. Place an inverted heat-proof plate on top of the rolls to keep them submerged in the water. Cover the saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer over low heat for 45 minutes to an hour or until leaves are tender and the rice filling is cooked through.

Before serving, squeeze the juice of 1 lemon over the grape leaves.

Nancy Cordi's Stuffed Grape Leaves

Classic Middle Eastern Hummus

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Inactive prep time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

1 cup dried garbanzo beans
1/2 cup grape seed oil
Juice of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon tahini (optional but recommended)
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon garlic powder
Salt to taste
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 cup raw pine nuts
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Chopped parsley for garnish

Directions

Soak  garbanzo beans in salted water overnight or simmer beans for 1 1/2 hours until they are twice their size. They must be soft and tender before draining.

In a food processor, add drained garbanzo beans, grape seed oil, lemon juice, tahini, cumin, and garlic powder. Blend until smooth. Taste and add a pinch of salt or a squeeze of lemon juice if needed. Set aside.

In a small skillet, toast pine nuts on low heat until slightly golden brown. Remove from heat and allow to cool.

Add hummus to a bowl or platter and sprinkle smoked paprika and pine nuts on top. Finish with olive oil. You can also garnish with chopped parsley.

  Nancy Cordi's Hummus

———–

Pitch

It isn’t every day that a personal chef gets this close to hitting the big time. And, yet, APPCA member and personal chef Nicole Gaffney has made it to the final three in Food Network Star. It was a nail biter of an episode. Still in New York at the Gotham West Market in Hell’s Kitchen, each of the four remaining contestants were tasked with creating a 30-second video promo of their proposed show. Food Network execs Bob Tuschman and Susie Fogelson would review the promos and greenlight three of them to go on to produce a pilot. This pilot would be viewed by all of us at home. Then we get to vote and select the competition’s ultimate winner.

Nicole was up first with her promo highlighting her proposed show on global coastal cuisine. Susie like the camera comfort and down home style Nicole showed, but worried that without global expertise, which Nicole admitted she lacked. Bob, too, was concerned that her concept was too broad, and thought it should be narrowed to American coastal cuisine, which Nicole knows.

The moment of truth came after the other three contestants faced Bob and Susie with their promos and Sara was eliminated. That placed Nicole with Lenny and Luca in the final three and off they were to film their pilots, which were to feature their point of view and expertise.

And who was the Food Network director of these pilots? Robert Irvine. “I hope this isn’t going to be an episode of Pilot Impossible,” Nicole joked.

Nicole focused on Louisiana coastal cuisine for her pilot, “My Coastal Kitchen.” She got off to a shaky start by nervously reciting recipe ingredients and Irvine stopped her cold. He wanted more of her, not an ingredient list. More stories. And, importantly, he asked her if she was having fun, to which she retorted, “Not as much as I should!” This is about fun, Irvine reminded her–and that simple tip revved up her energy levels. By the time we saw the actual pilot, Nicole had fully mastered her presentation of New Orleans-Style “BBQ” Clams, telling charming family stories, taking swigs from a bottle of beer, and offering some terrific cooking tips. She was on!

With Robert Irvine

And now it’s up to us. Nicole has two formidable challengers in Lenny and Luca. So, here’s the deal: go to the Food Network Star website and vote, vote, vote. Yes, you can vote up to 10 times. But it has to be done before Wednesday, Aug. 6 at 11 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Do it! Let’s see one of our beloved APPCA members showcased on the Food Network with her own show!

What’s your culinary perspective? What dishes do you love to brag about?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

There’s altogether too much zucchini that grows over the summer! Don’t you agree? If you have a garden planted with it or other summer squashes, you can pare down the bounty by picking some of the blossoms, which can be used for a variety of dishes. (And if you aren’t gardening, look for squash blossoms at your local farmers market or Latin markets.)

Squash blossoms can be chopped up and incorporated into an omelet. In Mexico, they’re frequently used in making quesadillas with beautifully runny cheeses. But, they’re also a favorite in Italy, where you’ll find them stuffed and fried.

Our friend Caron Golden spent some time in the kitchen with San Diego chef Miguel Valdez and he taught her all the tricks you need to know to turn these magnificent but fragile yellow blossoms into a winning appetizer. We’ll let Caron take it from here.

fried blossoms

So, here are some tips Miguel gave me that have really helped me do a better job in making stuffed squash blossoms. The first, of course, is the purchase. They should look fresh and firm, not wilted or browned around the edges. But you also want them closed, not wide open. My friend Trish Watlington, who grows squash for her restaurant The Red Door, where Miguel used to be the chef, gave me an additional tip. Wait until late afternoon to pick them. In the course of the day, they’ll have opened. By late afternoon they’ll have closed again and are ready for the taking.

When you’re ready to prepare them, don’t rinse the blossoms. They’re too fragile for rinsing and will bruise. Instead, fill a bowl with cold water, and after opening the blossom just enough to check for bugs, dunk the blossoms in the water and then lay them down gently on paper towels.

Now you want to make your stuffing. Miguel showed me a very basic approach, using ricotta, marscapone, eight ball squash, a red onion, fresh thyme and mint, eggs, bread crumbs, and oil. You’ll want to do a small dice on the squash and onion so they’ll fit through the hole of the pastry bag. The squash, onion, and herbs are sauteed in olive oil until they’re soft. While the vegetables cool, whisk the eggs vigorously to incorporate lots of air. What you want are large bubbles and a liquid texture–no strings of egg whites. (And, don’t toss what you don’t use. The eggs will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days.)

Once the vegetables are at room temperature, you’ll make the stuffing by stirring them together with the two cheeses and some salt and pepper to taste. Then fill a plate or flat container with bread crumbs. They don’t have to be store purchased. If you have stale bread or crackers (or crackers you enjoy), pulverize them in the food processor.

Now, what’s your stuffing technique? Here’s where things can go seriously wrong–I know because I’ve been a perpetrator of this. Don’t do what I used to do, which was to open the blossom and fill it from the top, keeping the petals open. It makes a mess and tears the petals. What you want to do instead is slice off about a quarter inch of the bottom of the blossom, where the stem is. Keep it though. You’ll fill the blossom from that clean opening and then insert the bottom/stem inside so that it will look whole. Brilliant.

Another tip Miguel offered also related to stuffing. If you’re doing this solo, filling the pastry bag can be a tricky mess. Instead, pull out a tall container–like your utensil holder on the sink. Place the empty pastry bag inside and fold the top of the bag over the container. Then your hands are free to fill it with your stuffing. Pull the top up and twist it gently to ease the stuffing solidly down toward the tip. At that point, gently place the tip into the bottom of one of the blossoms to measure how far you need to cut (assuming you are using a plastic pastry bag or a plastic storage bag and not a pastry bag with plastic tips). Then you can cut the tip of the bag and start squeezing, filling the blossom until the top of the petals begin to bulge a little. Pull out the pastry bag and insert the stem piece, wiggling it to work it just inside so it will stay put.

Now you’re going to put it all together. Using one hand (to keep the other clean), gently dip the stuffed blossom into the egg, shake off the excess, then dredge it lightly in the bread crumbs. When you’ve done all of them, put them in the refrigerator to chill for about an hour or, if need be, overnight.

Then you’re ready to fry them. Use a vegetable oil and heat in a tall pot to 400 degrees. Add the blossoms (don’t crowd them) and give them two minutes in the fryer. Remove and drain on a paper towel. Serve them on greens or over a favorite sauce.

And, here’s the final tip. Be creative. One night last summer, The Red Door served stuffed blossoms for dessert. The stuffing was Nutella and cream cheese, breaded in panko crumbs, fried, then dipped in dark chocolate and chopped walnuts. Who knew…?

Nutella and cream cheese

Stuffed Squash Blossoms
by Miguel Valdez
Yield: 10 appetizers
20 fresh, firm squash blossoms
1 8-ounce container of marscapone
1 15-ounce container of ricotta
1/2 small red onion, diced
1 eight-ball squash, diced
1 teaspoon fresh thyme, leaves stripped from stems and chopped
1 teaspoon fresh mint, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
1 teaspoon olive oil
4 eggs, well beaten
1 cup bread crumbs (purchased or made from crackers or dry bread)
Grapeseed, canola, or other vegetable oil for frying

Gently wash the squash blossoms by dipping them a few times into a bowl of cold water, then lay them carefully on paper towels. Heat olive oil in a pan and add diced vegetables and herbs, sauteing until soft. Spread on a sheet pan to cool so added cheese won’t melt.

Trim the bottom of the squash blossom and shake out the piston. Save the end/stem to place inside after stuffing the blossom.

In a bowl, mix the two cheeses and the cooled vegetables with salt and pepper. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until they’re quite liquid and bubbly and there are no strands of egg whites. Fill a plate or flat container with the bread crumbs.

prepping the blossoms

Using a tall, empty container slip a pastry bag (or large plastic bag inside, handing the top of the bag over the side of the container. Fill the bag with the cheese and vegetable stuffing. Pull the sides up and, twisting the bag, push the mixture to the tip of the bag. Measure the cut of the tip by inserting the tip into the cut end of the blossom. Snip the tip so that it will just fit inside the squash blossom bottom hole.

Squeeze the mixture into the blossom until the petal begin to bulge. Pull the pastry bag tip out and carefully insert the step back into the hole. When all are stuffed, dip the blossoms into the egg, then with one hand, dredge the blossoms lightly in the bread crumbs. They should be covered with the crumbs but not so thick you can’t see the blossoms. Place on a plate or tray and refrigerate. You can let them sit for an hour to firm up or even overnight. If you have leftover cheese mixture or eggs, you can keep these for other uses.

stuffing the blossoms

Heat the grapeseed or canola oil in a fryer or tall pot until it reaches 400 degrees. Dip the blossoms in the oil for two minutes. Remove and drain on a paper towel. You can plate them on a bed of greens or tomato sauce or salsa. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar.

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New York, New York! The Statue of Liberty. The Empire State Building. And, the Chelsea Market, where the Food Network is headquartered–and where the five remaining Food Network Star contestants, including our own Nicole Gaffney, headed to from Las Vegas for week nine of the competition. And what was the challenge? Making an appearance on The Rachael Ray Show!

Ronnybrook Milk Bar

But, we get ahead of ourselves. The five met up with all three mentor judges and learned that they would be going downstairs to the Chelsea Market to do a live feed story on a summer food staple. Each got an assigned vendor and Nicole was sent to Ronnybrook Milk Bar. As in… ICE CREAM! Nicole sailed through her stand up, even giving a tip about Philadelphia ice cream. Bobby Flay told her that she seemed a natural in her environment and she won the challenge. This gave her an advantage for the main competition. Each contestant was to appear on The Rachael Ray Show and in three and a half minutes cook a dish that resolved a dinner dilemma for a family. Nicole got to view each clip of each family and their dinner dilemmas and then strategically assign a contestant to that family.

Nicole chose the Flag family, who wanted healthier food ideas. Nicole gave them a shrimp and vegetable lettuce wrap. Her tips on her segment were terrific–keeping a well-stocked pantry among them. And she cooked up what looked like a terrific dish. Except that she included a sriracha sauce for the kids and the littlest one spit it out. Not good.

On Rachael Ray

Fortunately, Giada liked the dish, but did point out the obvious gaffe. Poor Sara and Loreal did worse. So, Nicole made it to the final four, while Loreal, the butcher babe, was cut. Next week should be interesting! Keep it up, Nicole!

Have you cooked with squash blossoms? What do you make with them?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

Perhaps you’re a new personal chef eager to jump start your business. Or maybe your client base is going through a shift. Are you anticipating summer holiday slowdowns? You could be launching a new line of services under your business–like catering or teaching cooking classes. Whatever it is, you need some media attention to draw in eyes who could turn into potential clients.

Now let’s stipulate first that simply getting a story about you in your local paper or getting quoted in a public radio story on food trends isn’t necessarily going to translate into more business. But media outreach should be another marketing tool in your arsenal–like social media, cooking demos, and, of course, having a quality website and business card.

Not sure how to get started? Well, here are five ways you can get reporters and editors to talk to you and, hopefully, about you:

1. Write a brief but well composed press release and send it to reporters covering the food, business, lifestyle, and/or health beats in your local media outlets (newspapers, news websites, radio, TV, bloggers, and podcasters). If you’re an APPCA member you have access to press release information in the training materials, including sample releases that you can personalize with information about you and your business. Be sure that the contacts you find are up to date–you don’t want to send a release to someone who hasn’t held that job in three years. And also be sure that the people you’re targeting are the right people for what you’re trying to accomplish. Tailor your press release to the angle of the story you’re pitching. You shouldn’t send the same release to a business reporter and a lifestyle reporter.

Facebook

 

Twitter logo

2. Assuming you’re on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or other social media platforms–and you should be–start following/friending reporters with whom you want to develop a business relationship. Periodically ask them relevant questions. As you get friendly, let them know what you do and ask if you can send them info about an event you’re participating in or a new type of service you’re launching. Offer to serve as a resource if they have an article or segment they’re working on in an area you specialize in.

3. Do some research and find out if your target media people have their own blogs. Subscribe to them. Read them. Most important, leave friendly comments on them–but only if you can offer a relevant observation to the discussion. Be sure to include your website URL in the comment or sign in with the web URL to leave the comment so they can find you.

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4. Create a small media event. Perhaps you’re launching a new fall menu for catering or you’ve just started a new cooking class series. Set up an event exclusively for media–a tasting, cooking demo or class. Alternatively, invite them to attend an event you’re already holding–as your (comped) guest. Either way, be sure to have useful takeaways on hand for them, such as recipes, a press release and fact sheet about your business and what you’re promoting, and perhaps a small package of cookies or jar of jam or some other edible treat you made.

5. Read, watch, or listen to stories by your target media. As you get to know what they’re interested in, you can tailor an email note, mentioning pieces of theirs you’ve found interesting and ask if they have an interest in an area in which you specialize–cooking for seniors or athletes, lessons learned in running a personal chef business, teaching cooking classes to children, etc.–and offer your expertise in a story. Do some research and provide data about related trends to demonstrate your knowledge of the topic. Reporters are always under the gun to come up with unique story ideas. If you have a pitch for a piece they find intriguing, you’re helping them do their job. That’s priceless.

Remember, this isn’t a one-shot attempt. This is a process. You’re building relationships and that takes time. And, honestly, you have to have something newsworthy to cover. Don’t waste attempts at attention with news that really isn’t all that newsy or media targets will simply delete or block your communications. Give them something to really excite–and help–them.

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Vegas sundae

Back in Las Vegas for week eight of Food Network Star and our Nicole Gaffney was one of six contestants left. This week, the six met with Alton Brown and Giada De Laurentiis in the Poker Tournament Room of Caesar’s Palace to learn what one-of-a-kind culinary experience they were to enjoy, take in the meal and the ambiance, and then divide into two teams to create their own special meal for the judges.

Nicole drew the $1,000 Golden Sundae at Serendipity 3, which she described as “Vegas on a plate.” She couldn’t finish the scoops of Tahitian vanilla ice cream and passion fruit-infused caviar served with a 24-carat gold spoon, but she told us on Twitter, “It was crazy good!”

Nicole then joined team Sarah as Sarah’s first pick, along with Luca, to create a four-course “Around the World” meal. Sarah gave Nicole frogs legs as an ingredient–something foreign to Nicole–who decided to fry the legs and accompany them with a spicy tamarind-glazed sauce with cucumber mango slaw. Then she took on dessert, with her toasted marshmallow ice cream as the star of a deconstructed s’mores dish.

Team Sarah totally bested Team Emma in the eyes of Alton, Giada, Susie and Bob, and guest judge Penn Jillette. Kudos to Nicole, whose frog legs (if not her story) and dessert were a big hit. Sadly, Emma, who surprisingly was unfamiliar with her assigned ingredient, Mangalitsa pork, and told a gruesome story about burning pigs in a barn, was eliminated.

And then there were five–who are off to New York for the next challenge! Stay tuned! Go Nicole!

Big Apple Bound

How have you successfully gotten media attention for you and your business? Please share!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

 

Natalie Lewis

APPCA member Natalie Lewis may have a raging sweet tooth, but she’s deep into savory dishes that she makes for both her personal chef and catering clients. Trained at Le Cordon Bleu, Paris, with a diploma in French cuisine, the Cincinnati native is a dedicated traveler who has enjoyed enhancing her knowledge of regional and cultural fare. Early in her career she took that knowledge to jobs at upscale catering catering companies and restaurants. Her move to Napa gave her a greater appreciation for local, sustainable cooking and the art of viticulture. Today, she lives with her family in Northern New Jersey.

Natalie's Sweet Pea and Parmesan Salad with Burrata and Capiocola

Natalie’s Sweet Pea and Parmesan Salad with Burrata and Capiocola

Natalie found us like many others–with a desire to get out of the restaurant business she starting researching other career options in the food world and found APPCA through an Internet search. She joined us in 2010.

“The best benefit has been that people find me easily when they do Google searches for personal chefs,” she says. “The APPCA website is one of the first to come up. So I’ve gained a lot of clients this way. The forums are also great, so I can connect with other personal chefs and compare notes.”

Natalie's Crab and Shrimp Avocado Salad with Tomato Coulis

Natalie’s Crab and Shrimp Avocado Salad with Tomato Coulis

Among Lewis’s other passions is her food blog, Natalie’s Daily Crave, where she posts recipes–mostly original–and gorgeous food photography.

The recipe below originated from cocktail appetizers she makes for her catering clients. “I make little bite-size red potatoes stuffed with blue cheese and bacon,” she says. “They’re always a hit at parties so I thought a potato salad with a similar concept would be a crowd pleaser also.”

This salad is perfect for summer picnics and barbecues–and something you can adapt for your own catering clients!

Natalie Lewis' Bacon-and-Blue-Cheese-Potato-Salad-so-delish1

Bacon and Blue Cheese Potato Salad
from Natalie Lewis

  • 3 lb red skin potatoes
  • 6 oz good blue cheese
  • 10-12 strips thick cut bacon
  • ¾ cup mayonnaise
  • 3 Tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 3-4 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh chives
  • 3 heaping Tbsp fresh chopped dill
  • salt and pepper

Clean and scrub outside of potatoes. Cut potatoes in half and add potatoes to a large pot of salted water and bring to a boil. Boil for approximately 10-15 minutes, or until they are fork tender, but still firm.

Meanwhile cook the bacon and crumble the blue cheese with a fork. Next, make the dressing. In a small bowl add the mayonnaise, Dijon, vinegar, chives and dill. Mix well and set aside.

Once the potatoes are cooked drain well. Roughly chop the potatoes into 1-inch chunks and while warm, pour the dressing over the potatoes. Mix well and add salt and pepper.

Add the crumbled bacon an blue cheese. Top with additional bacon, blue cheese and chopped chives. Can serve warm or cold. Store in fridge 2 days in advance.

*Photos courtesy of Natalie Lewis

—————–

Vegas pool party

So, here we are at week seven of Food Network Star, so thrilled that our own Nicole Gaffney is now one of six contestants and in Las Vegas for a series of new challenges. But, there’s always a wrench thrown into these competitions–and one came this week in the form of reinserting a contestant. Yes, Star Salvation has ended and into the competition returned… ta dah… Luca! Gorgeous Luca, whose English has been transformed.

So we’re back to seven contestant and have two related challenges. The first, taking place in the Bacchanal Buffet at Caesar’s Palace, was with judge/mentor Giada De Laurentiis, who gave each contestant 90 second to describe up to three dishes in a way that would make her hungry. Kudos to Emma, who was the only one to nail it with all three. Nicole, starting with a beef pho, used words like viscosity and unctuous–great in an essay for an English class, but not very appealing or understandable for the general public looking for something delicious to eat.

Moving on, this critical skill was to be on display again for the main challenge–a pool party at the hotel’s Venus pool. Each contestant had an hour to prepare a dish representing their culinary POV and then a minute to pitch their dish to the crowd. Each of the 100 party guests was given three tokens to spend on three dishes, plus they were given what Alton Brown calls the “dial of doom,” a marketing gadget used to measure each person’s reaction to each pitch.

Our Nicole decided to make a seared scallop wrapped in serrano ham, accompanied by romesco sauce. Just one problem. There was no serrano ham and Nicole decided to substitute prosciutto. But, she wasn’t exactly forthright about that in her pitch. “I’m guessing that no one at this party is going to be able to tell the difference between serrano ham and prosciutto,” Nicole said. Well, no one except the judges…

The good news? Alton and Giada liked her pitch, calling it concise and connected to her viewpoint. And, she was grace under pressure as a gust of wind almost swept away her dish during her pitch. But while both judges liked the flavors of her dish, Giada took her down on the misleading description. “I loved the scallops but not the serrano ham,” she said. “Don’t misguide them or they’ll never trust you again.”

It was a good lesson. Gotta make a substitute with an ingredient? Be upfront about it.

Nevertheless, Nicole made the first cut with the top four, with Lenny winning and doing a celebratory belly flop into the pool. Can’t wait to see what next week brings!

Have a favorite summer dish you make for clients? Please share!

 Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

No matter how confident you are in yourself, your cooking abilities, and your business skills, sometimes the personal touch can make the difference. That’s why we regularly hold weekend Personal Chef Seminars. It allows Dennis and me to meet new members just launching their businesses and give them hands-on guidance in the business of being a personal chef. Yes, we have wonderful printed and online materials available to you–and you shouldn’t have any problem getting started with them alone. But gathering with a group of like-minded people for a weekend of learning and sharing just clarifies the process that much more. And it gives you compadres and commadres with whom you can share questions and issues long after the weekend is over.

photo 3

What takes place? Whether we travel to cities like Chicago and Baltimore or hold the seminars at our home in San Diego, the basics are the same. We review the training program and manual one bite at a time, taking it at your pace and answering your  questions. We talk about business plans, finances, and marketing. And we answer your questions. We delve into things like website SEO, advertising, and media exposure. And we answer your questions. We introduce you to Personal Chef Office and the Personal Chef Forums. We even talk recipes and cooking methods. And we answer your questions. We love answering your questions.

photo 1-1

Last month, we held an intimate seminar with four remarkably talented women: Mary Ziebart of Chicago, Jackie Buesa of Carlsbad, Rochelle Schofield of Los Angeles, and Valerie Cathell of Virginia. Each came to us with a desire to not just to cook for a living but to help change their communities. It was inspiring to be with each of them, as well as watch them spur each other on and, ultimately, bond.

Mary, for example, is just entering her career as a personal chef, having attended culinary school and spent time as a private chef and then an educator–even winning the 2012 Foodservice Educator Network International (FENI) award for Secondary School Teacher of the Year Award. “I loved teaching but I wanted to get back into the kitchen again and make people smile,” she says. “This seminar took the fear out of starting my own business.”

photo 2

Then there was Jackie, who graduated from Le Cordon Bleu with highest honors. She has been employed at a high-end coastal resort and has worked as a line cook, banquet chef, caterer, and healthy cooking teacher. Now she’s interested in focusing her talents on a smaller scale, emphasizing fresh and simple foods for a clientele that appreciates the value of local and organic.

“The weekend seminary was such a great experience,” she says. “You and Dennis are so knowledgeable and also very patient. You really took the time to make sure everyone in the class had a clear understanding of the material. You shared so much about your extensive experience in the business. I gained valuable insight of the business and challenges I might encounter. And, you shared the many rewards of becoming a personal chef.”

photo 3-1

I’m blushing. And, yet, that’s what Dennis and I strive for with these seminars because we want you to return home and feel empowered to get your business going with confidence. We want your takeaway also to be that we’re here for you every step of the way to help you grow your business–whether we do it by email, phone, or over a cup of coffee.

Val, who grew up the child of fabulous cooks, bonded with her family in the kitchen. Like many personal chefs, she hasn’t had formal culinary training, but was always cooking for friends, who asked her to cater events and urged her to go into business for herself. Now she wants to take this ability to feed people and serve others. “I am a very maternal thinker and I do believe we show love with our food,” she says. She writes about food, wants to teach others cooking skills, and loves that she can share her talent with others professionally.

But that doesn’t mean that launching a business automatically leads to success. That’s why she joined APPCA and why she signed up for the seminar. “It was invaluable in helping me understand the important business aspects of being a personal chef. Your instruction was thorough and so entertaining. Your personal stories were wonderful and provided great insights and tips on things to do and not do, like never shop on your own money and always get the fee up front.”

It also gave her the confidence to get the most out of Personal Chef Office and the manual so she can better control and grow her business. “And now that you taught me about the Personal Chef Forum I also know where to look when I have questions.”

On that beautiful Sunday afternoon as everyone was packing up to head home, Val gave me the best compliment I could hope for, “You are an amazing woman. I can see that it comes from the heart. It’s what I aspire to.”

My passion for this work and for helping our members attain their goals does come from the heart. And I hope that Dennis and I can meet more of you in person at our weekend seminars so we can help you take your talent to your community in a way that brings you success and deep satisfaction. Stay tuned for our announcement of our next weekend seminar and be sure to sign up! We can’t wait to see you!

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Green screen dreams

For APPCA member Nicole Gaffney, week six of Food Network Star wasn’t a dream experience. This week she and her fellow  contestants were charged with turning their POV into a packaged food product. They each had one hour to cook their product and then had to “sell” it in a commercial featuring a 360-degree green screen and virtual production stage. Each was assigned a theme and our New Jersey girl Nicole got the Wild West.

We knew that could be an issue once we saw her face drop. After all, how does a chef with a coastal point of view sell a product in the desert?

Nicole decided to make a tomato onion jam that she explained to the judges jibed with her coastal POV since it goes great with fish and is a good base for a dish with mussels or clams. Using her nickname, she named the product “Coley’s Coastal Tomato Onion Jam,” and her sales pitch was essentially, “You don’t need to live by the ocean to get the laid back flavors of the shore.” But when she opened her commercial with, “It’s drier out here than Death Valley in Prohibition,” and Bobby Flay’s smile turned into kind of a snicker, we knew she was in trouble and so did she.

Fortunately, her jam was delicious and the judges all gave her raves. But they were honest about her star power going AWOL. Giada De Laurentiis gave her sage advice. “You’re wound up so tight. Let go. Be who you want to be.”

For the first time Nicole was in the bottom three–but she wasn’t eliminated. So, phew. And we’ll see her in Las Vegas next week for week seven!

Have a question about starting up your own personal chef business? Have you been to one of our seminars? Let us know what you learned that weekend! Leave a comment!

 Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

 

 

Pete McCracken

Our beloved “answer man,” Pete McCracken, passed away on June 20. Pete, who was not only an APPCA member but a city councilman in his town of Porterville, Calif., had suffered a heart attack in late May and also had cancer.

Pete and I had been exchanging emails for the past month on a project we were working on and he never said a word about his illnesses. For me, personally, his death has been a big shock and heart breaker. He was truly colorful; those who knew him reveled in his stories. And he had many.

For those of us in APPCA who participate in the online forums, he was, indeed, our answer man. Post a question and you could count on Pete doing thorough research and coming up with an answer. He would fully investigate topics and provide informative links. It was a passion with Pete to have the answers for everything and we loved him for it. In fact, once something was answered by Pete the conversation pretty much ended, with all parties fully informed.

As you’ll learn if you go to the Fresno Bee’s obituary, Pete was a man of many and diverse talents and interests. He was a farmer and spoke Arabic, having farmed in Yemen for three years. He consulted in a variety of countries for the World Bank on agricultural irrigation and drainage. For a couple of years Pete and his wife Wanda owned and operated Le Bistro, a French restaurant in Porterville. And,  following his passion for dance, the couple also owned and operated a dance studio that taught Western dance. With all that, Pete still found time to serve his community as chairman of the council of cities in Tulare County, a member of the Porterville’s Planning Commission, and Porterville’s mayor from 2009 to 2010.

And, of course, Pete was an accomplished chef.

How could a life so rich not be celebrated! He was a really smart man, one heckofa chef, and a true individual! One of a kind, indeed! We send our condolences to Wanda, his son Matthew, and his three stepchildren. And we encourage you to share your memories of Pete below.

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Week 5

Photo courtesy of Food Network

APPCA member Nicole Gaffney pretty much sailed through week five on Food Network Star. The eight finalists were driven to Knott’s Berry Farm for their challenge–preparing an assigned classic American food pairing for the 4th of July in one hour and then presenting a live demo of the dish in four minutes to an audience in the theme park’s Wagon Camp Amphitheater.

Nicole was assigned barbecue pork and onion rings. Well, how does a chef make barbecue anything in an hour? Nicole quickly came up with Spicy Pork Kabobs with Pineapple, creating a chipotle marinade inspired by Mexican tacos al pastor. Then she did a quick pickle of a shallot before breading and frying it to make onion rings. Through this, during one of her little camera interviews, she made a point about herself that went viral on social media. “I have a chronic case of resting bitch face,” she said. “I need to put on a smile and work it.”

Work it she did. Judge Bobby Flay said he liked both her food and her fun demo. But while the other judges agreed that she engaged the audience and made a good dish, Giada De Laurentiis pointed out that Nicole didn’t quite link her dish to her Jersey Shore background or coastal POV. Nevertheless, she is safe and moving on to the next challenge next week. Go Nicole!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

 

 

 

 

 

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