Congratulations! After a lot of hard work, marketing, and great word of mouth you’ve got a full stable of clients to work for. Just as many cook dates as you want and need.

But don’t get too comfy. It’s inevitable that at some point one of those clients is going to have bad news for you. Could be they’re moving out of town. Could be their life circumstances–or finances–have changed. Or could be they just want to make a change. But now you’re down a client and some income.

What are you planning on doing to make up that void?

For some chefs, it might be good timing. They’re ready to slow down the business. For others, it might offer the time and incentive to expand their personal chef umbrella into other areas like teaching, catering, or writing.

But for everyone else there’s that matter of shopping for a new client–or two–to fill the new gap.

The first lesson is never stop marketing yourself. Even when you’re full up with clients. Even when you don’t see any threat to your business. Change always happens and you don’t want to be invisible to your potential client base when it does.

Here are some ideas from current personal chefs:

  • Be up front and ask clients for referrals: “I ask my other clients for referrals,” says Jennifer Grawburg. “I still ask everyone I meet, ‘if you know anyone who needs a private chef…'” adds Ray Lopez.
  • Be out there: “I have monthly on air cooking spots on our local news station. I also have cooking classes I do with the community. I’m always advertising even when I’m full,” Grawburg adds.
  • Be online: Lopez also does internet marketing.
  • Contribute to your community: Lopez donates to sick friends, and church functions. So does Grawburg. “I do a lot of charity promotions throughout the year too. I give to a few that are close to my heart and a few others that are bigger organizations with more attention.”

And consider these:

  • If you and your client are separating on good terms, don’t be shy about asking for referrals.
  • Identify who your ideal client is. A young family? A health and fitness aficionado? A professional couple? Someone who has a specific medical condition? With that knowledge, target those institutions and organizations where they would be. Get involved in an organization directed to helping a specific medical condition. Join a gym where you might find potential clients–or target gyms in your area and offer to hold a cooking demo. Be creative. There’s always an intriguing angle for you to come up with.
  • Do you have favorite reporters or food bloggers in your region? Think up some story ideas for them about food topics or holiday food topics and help that person out by offering these ideas and yourself as a source. In other words, get yourself some publicity!
  • Never leave home without your business card. You never know who you’re going to meet in the course of a day and if you’re open to chatting with those people you could find that they know someone who knows someone…

Finally, no matter the reason for the client separation, make sure it’s on good terms and that you don’t do or say anything that could burn bridges. They may come back!

When was the last time you lost a client? How did you rebound from that?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Caron Golden

About 

Founder of premier organization of personal chefs inspires students to follow their dreams of culinary entrepreneurship.

Candy Wallace, executive director of the American Personal & Private Chef Association (APPCA), today was recognized by Sullivan University’s National Center for Hospitality Studies as its 33rd Distinguished Guest Chef.

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