Classic Filipino Adobo

Filed under: Recipes , Tags: , , , , — Author: Caron Golden , October 14, 2019

I don’t know about your community, but in San Diego we are enjoying a boom of Filipino-American chefs who either are running Filipino restaurants or putting a Filipino flavor spin on fine dining restaurants. Back in 2018 I shared a recipe here from my friend Anthony Sinsay for his Mussels Adobo–one of my favorite dishes. He’s since moved on to Seattle, where he is the chef at Outlier.

 

Another chef friend, Evan Cruz, took the time a few years ago to introduce me to his family and their market, JNC Pinoy Food Mart. Here Cruz’s aunt Nora served me house-made pancit, a dish that revolves around thin rice-stick noodles tossed with pork, shrimp, and chicken. There was kare-kare, a rich mixture of thick peanut sauce, eggplant, and string beans. I enjoyed taro leaves cooked in coconut milk like spinach, classic lumpia—a Filipino spring roll stuffed with ground pork, beef, onion, carrots, celery, and water chestnuts—and crispy pork belly served with what’s called liver sauce. After all, this is a culture that uses everything from the animal. The pig’s innards are used to make a rich brown sauce.

Then Cruz’s grandmother, Rosario Cruz, showed me how to make a family and customer favorite, turon. This dessert version of lumpia is something you’d find as a mirienda, or snack, in the Philippines and is especially popular with kids. Cruz said the best ones are sold by vendors in front of elementary schools—like an ice cream truck. The dish is simple. Using a lumpia wrapper, which is just made of flour and water, you place slices of plantain or pear banana and jack fruit on the wrapper. Then sprinkle a good tablespoon of sugar over the slices. Fold the bottom of the wrapper over and tucked under the fruit and sugar. Roll, bring in the sides, moisten the top inside of the wrapper with a slurry of cornstarch and water so it will adhere to the rest of the wrapper, and finish rolling. Chill for a day, then fry in vegetable oil and finish in caramel. Easy. But let it cool so you won’t burn your tongue.

Cruz, whose grandmother taught him many of the dishes he grew up with, showed me how to make the classic Filipino adobo, with the caveat that everyone in every village throughout the Philippines makes it slightly differently. His adobo is what he calls “dry,” and features pork or chicken. He noted that anything that can be braised can be an adobo. Those living by the sea, like his maternal grandparents, tend to make it with octopus or squid. His paternal grandparents lived inland. The sauce ingredients are simple—soy sauce, distilled vinegar, water, bay leaves, garlic, black peppercorns, and canola oil. While others include onion, Cruz doesn’t. It’s not part of his family tradition.

Now, the polite way to eat adobo is over white rice. But Cruz laughed when he told me that he and his younger brother Marc always fought as kids over the way their dad prepared it—adding the rice to the finished adobo so that it could caramelize and get crispy. And, Cruz made it for me like that, too.

Some family traditions are universal.

Chicken or Pork Adobo
From Evan Cruz
Serves 4

Ingredients
4 pounds chicken , cut into 8 pieces or chicken wings
Or you can substitute cubed pork shoulder or belly
2 cups low sodium soy
2 cups white distilled vinegar
2 cups water
4 bay leaves
8 ounces garlic, peeled
2 ounces black peppercorns
2 ounces canola oil

Directions
In a large pot, add all ingredients except the canola oil and bring to a simmer. Cook for about and hour and a half or until the meat is tender. You can serve it as is or follow the next step.

Remove half the meat and continue to reduce liquid by half.

In a large sauté pan over medium heat add canola oil. Add meat and lightly sauté. Add reduced sauce and reduce until sauce glazes meat.

Serve with steamed white rice.

Have you ever tried or cooked Filipino food? What dishes are your or your clients’ favorites?

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Caron Golden

About 

Founder of premier organization of personal chefs inspires students to follow their dreams of culinary entrepreneurship.

Candy Wallace, executive director of the American Personal & Private Chef Association (APPCA), today was recognized by Sullivan University’s National Center for Hospitality Studies as its 33rd Distinguished Guest Chef.

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