As a national organization APPCA has members serving clients across the country. We know that the  coronavirus has hit different regions with different intensity over the past five months. That makes it challenging to determine on a national level what the appropriate approach is for serving clients–beyond CDC recommendations and ServSafe guidance. Each member is bound to be guided by local and state health regulations. For some, there’s more flexibility due to fewer outbreaks. For others, there may not be any real options in a total shutdown.

It’s a confusing time.

We’re seeing a variety of approaches being taken by personal chefs. While there are some who just don’t feel comfortable going into other people’s kitchens Christine Robinson and Dennis Nosko of A Fresh Endeavor Personal Chef Services in Boston are going full speed ahead:

“We are cooking for a select number of clients and have maintained the same routine since March, with a couple of add-ons,” says Christine. “We cook in their homes and have established a ‘safety plan’ for each household…we dress out of the dryer, we are masked and carry sanitizers, cleaners, and just got a new UV wand…depending on the house we use their cookware or ours, or a combo…we maintain distancing, take our temps several times a day and have remained healthy…our habits were formed early in the pandemic, and we have modified and enhanced them as needed…some clients have not come back yet, a couple have, and we have added new people…we clean everything when we arrive and again when we leave…honestly, I like the routine and the attention to detail…we spend most of our downtime at home and do not venture out where crowds may be, and have eaten at home since March 15th except for three take outs from Chipotle…so far so good but we are not letting our guard down…”

Another chef is choosing to cook at his home for clients and then making a delivery at the client’s front door. This chef keeps the food in an ice chest and texts the client to make sure they’re home before leaving.

Similarly, we have heard from a chef who is making “to go” meals for clients from a commercial kitchen.

Another potential piece to puzzle out is payment. Anyone who ventures out to shop for food or other provisions knows that retailers prefer not to take cash or checks these days. Likewise, you are probably not eager to take anything other than virtual payments. Here’s a link to a site called Clockify, which lists 16 payment methods for small businesses, along with the features that they say are important, including transaction fees, processing times, payment methods, and transfer limits.

As difficult as this year has been, you all know how important you are to your clients. In some cases, you’re probably a lifeline to normalcy–something we’re all seeking these days. And you’re providing people with exactly what they need: delicious, healthy food that is an important factor in fending off disease. Perhaps, like Christine adds, you’re even doing a little bit extra for your clients.

“We go out of our way with the precautions but try to normalize this unfathomable situation as much as possible for our clients with humor and sensitivity…we have a standing rule with all clients that we are out in the stores more often than they are and are happy to pick stuff up, so have running lists with most of them as we know the local stores really well and can be in and out quickly…”

Who wouldn’t appreciate that!

Are you serving clients in your region? How are you going about it?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Well, it’s been, what, five months–six months–since what should probably call “before times.” Who can keep track anymore? In that time, many or most of us have found our lives and businesses have been turned upside down. Some of us have gotten sick. Some have lost family or friends. Our country has lost more than 150,000 people. These are sad, confusing, frustrating days.

And, yet, we have to go on, albeit carefully. Those of us who operate solo businesses have to do our best to hang in there and find new resources, new ideas, and new opportunities to shine and earn a living. It’s all about flexibility, ingenuity, and doggedness.

Over the past several months we’ve tried to offer ideas and inspiration for new approaches to your personal chef business. And we’ll continue to do so.

Today, though, here are some tips for solo entrepreneurs. We tend to call these the lazy days of summer. If that’s true for you, perhaps it’s the right time to start mulling over next steps and thinking about how to rev up business come fall. We’re hoping these tips can sizzle your brain and juice up your enthusiasm for this very important business you run.

  • Stay agile and don’t be afraid to say no. Andrew Wassenaar of software firm Timely makes the great point that without extra staff, solo business owners have less baggage and are able to enjoy more freedom in business. It’s so true. You may wish you had help or a boss to tell you what to do, but as a personal chef running your own business you have the agility to switch things up if you find something isn’t working or you discover something unexpected that brings you joy–and more money! As Wassenaar notes, it also gives you the flexibility to say no to whatever doesn’t align with your vision. “It comes back to the fact that time is valuable, and when it’s being consumed by things that don’t contribute to what you’re doing, it’s being wasted,” he writes.
  • Be specific with your goals. Kelly Spors of The Hartford’s SmallBiz Ahead published seven business tips from successful small business owners. One of them seemed directly relevant to personal chef business owners. Be very specific with your goals. Break big goals into smaller ones. It could be based on a timeline, such as 10 years, three years, and one year. It could be work/life. It could be seasonal. Once you have set your goals, develop a dashboard that allows you to note your progress with your goals to help you stay focused.
  • Build a wide range of skills. Small Business Trends published a list of 21 rules for solopreneurs to live by. Among them is “Build a Wide Range of Skills.” Now you already know how to cook, but during this down or downish time you could focus some more on the skills of owning a business–like marketing and accounting. Networking might seem like a crazy idea these days but “out of sight, out of mind” is a cliché that’s all too true. Work on your Zoom or Facetime skills and make or revive connections. Get smart with video and teach virtual cooking classes. Learn how to write professional recipes using tools like “The Recipe Writer’s Handbook” and put together virtual meal kits for clients or launch a food blog. Improve your food photography.
  • Get technical. Of all places, The UPS Store published a series of tips to advertise your solo business. Their idea is you want to drive awareness and engagement. Even if you don’t advertise, we hope you’re doing a good amount of marketing via social media, email newsletters, and blogs. We’ve offered lots of tips on these in the past, but here are some extra ones. If you’re on Twitter, use their polling feature in a multiple choice survey question about, well, anything. Perhaps you’re interested in changing up your menu. You could test out ideas. Or you’re considering targeting a different type of client. Ask questions that would help determine if athletes or vegans or adult children helping their aging parents are a viable option. Or just ask food-related questions that are fun and capture an audience’s imagination. They also advocate asking for retweets on Twitter (let’s extend that to “sharing” on Facebook and Instagram) and making use of SEO, but using SEO keywords that aren’t as competitive. Clueless about SEO? See above’s “build a wide range of skills.”
  • Band together with others. Time published a fascinating piece on small business owners banding together to adapt during the pandemic. It featured a New York City chef scheduled to open her first restaurant in March. She never got a chance to open it. As you can imagine, she had to transition to takeout and discovered a community of fellow restaurateurs in her neighborhood seeking to help one another. As personal chefs, you work alone. But you live in a community that might have other personal chefs, and certainly small markets, farmers, and other purveyors. You all need to do business. How can you help one another? Perhaps you buy from them, they promote your services. Or you and your fellow personal chefs who have different types of clients can cross promote each other. This calls for networking, zoom meetings, and ingenuity.

What tips resonate with you? Do you have any special tips to share with your colleagues?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Any of us who don’t live in food deserts have really not had to think hard about where to buy groceries–either for ourselves or clients. If we did, it was pretty much to sort out the many options available from our local supermarket to farmers markets to Costco/Sam’s Club to Trader Joe’s, culturally specific markets or our favorite specialty stores, including fish markets.

Then came the coronavirus and if you live in a region hit hard, you have faced staples shortages, long lines–and even the question of whether you should venture into a store at all. Which then led to the ethics of having someone else shop for you or being able to book an Instacart delivery date during your lifetime.

In short, marketing has been complicated for many of us.

Thankfully, much of the hoarding and shortages have abated, but the virus has not and we don’t know what fall months hold in store. So, it’s not a bad idea to know what your options are for now and looking ahead into at least the next six months.

This came into focus for me in a Real Simple story that ran at the end of April. It brought up some very good suggestions for identifying some unexpected places to find groceries. These include:

  • Local restaurants: Many have been helping both their suppliers and customers by selling groceries–either individual items or a bagged packages of groceries or meal kits. We’ve seen everything from flour, pasta, and yeast to fresh produce and seafood. Sometimes even toilet paper. They have great resources. Take advantage of them.
  • Online housewares stores. How often have you been to Bed, Bath & Beyond, World Market, Williams Sonoma or other housewares stores and picked up snacks or coffee/tea or specialty items? You can find them in the brick and mortar shops, but you can also shop for them online.
  • Restaurant supply companies: Sure, you may shop them for your equipment, but there are plenty of edible goods available–and some may even deliver. The caveat may be the quantity of packaged items, like 50 pounds of flour or 30-pound bags of rice. But splitting staples is what friends and neighbors are for, right?

  • CSAs: Community-supported agriculture, or CSAs, package weekly or bi-weekly boxes of fresh produce to subscribers. They do three things very well–they provide subscribers with a delightful and steady supply of local produce, they directly support farmers (many of whom live life on the edge and have now lost restaurant business), and they keep the money in the local economy. You can also expand your reach by purchasing boxes from Imperfect Foods and Misfits Market. These companies sell delicious produce but they are either a little odd looking or the wrong size for very strict supermarket guidelines. There are also CSAs for meats and seafood (think Moink, Butcher Box, Farmer’s Cart, and Heritage Foods–but also check around for local businesses that sell at your farmers market).
  • Alternative online stores: Real Simple notes that businesses like Thrive Market offers organic food and food delivery while Loop is an ecofriendly store focused on numerous brands and retailers that ships packages of grocery and health and beauty supplies in reusuable, returnable packaging.
  • Buy direct: Need white whole wheat flour? You could buy it directly from King Arthur Flour or Bob’s Red Mill. Why not just go directly to the company that has the product you’re craving or needing and see if they sell directly to consumers?

To this I’ll add that the megachains like Target and Walmart made a huge investment in grocery departments in the last few years. Neither is my first choice for grocery shopping, but in a pinch you can buy produce, milk, bread, and so much more. Same with Big Lots and “dollar stores.” I haven’t even mentioned Amazon’s offerings…

Do you have a good grocery wholesaler that’s open to the public? In San Diego, we have a place called Specialty Produce. They have long since branched out into specialty products from local makers and purveyors–local honey and other condiments, cheeses, pastas, etc. And, they’ve put together their own version of a CSA that combines fresh produce with local seafood, cheese, bread, and other products. Your city may have a similar wholesaler. Likewise, does your community have a butcher shop, seafood market, or other specialty store that has been selling other groceries that complement their main product line?

We’re living in disruptive times that require creativity and ingenuity from all of us. We’re lucky that the supply chain is holding for now (although the ethics of how that’s going is another discussion worth having) but keeping clients–and our own families–fed is probably not going to be as effortless for quite a while as our old marketing habits were back in January.

Where have you been shopping for food, if not your grocery store? Did we miss a great resource?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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When you run a small business, like a personal chef company, it can be helpful to keep track of trends–both to keep you in the know about the industry and consumers and to give you some new ways to think about what you do and what your clients want or need.

SmartBrief published a piece on July 2, 2020 by Laurie Demeritt, the CEO of The Hartman Group, which does market research. The Hartman Group just released The Hartman Group/FMI U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends COVID-19 Tracker report representing mid-May. Here’s some of what they found:

  • In planning meals, focus often goes to minimizing trips and waste through smart use of perishables.
  • Over one-third (36%) feel they are now eating healthier. Younger consumers especially have adjusted how they eat, with more emphasis on maintaining a healthy body while at home.
  • Older consumers aim to safeguard their health via prudent consumption, minimizing trips and waste.
  • During the timeframe of the report during the lockdown, 41% of consumers said they were cooking more of their meals, 27% said they were “planning more meals in advance, and 20% said they were trying more new dishes.
  • Consumers are reevaluating the very necessity of shopping trips and turning to larger, less frequent trips and alternative modes of sourcing perceived to be safer, such as online and click and collect.
  • Consumers are reevaluating the very necessity of shopping trips and turning to larger, less frequent trips and alternative modes of sourcing perceived to be safer, such as online and click and collect.
  • Looking farther ahead, new routines that focus on preparation for the unknown are likely to have lasting impacts.

Spinach Salad with balsamic vinaigrette and candied walnuts

So, no surprise, the pandemic has deeply impacted consumers’ lives when it comes to food and cooking. But what about those who are finding being in the kitchen less joyful? This same report noted that 23% of shoppers said their priority when cooking is to spend as little time as possible doing it and 33% said they seek “something interesting” to eat when they cook at home, which apparently indicates some fatigue with cooking.

And here’s where it gets even more fascinating for you: More than half–57%–of households outsource cooking to food service and dine out at least one a week with 21% doing it three or more times.

Is there anyone more “food service” than a personal chef? For these shoppers, the decision between cooking at home–seen as being more healthy than eating out–considers three things: cost, time and effort, and taste and cravings.

These little data bites should make you stop and think about the possibilities for your personal chef business. They can guide you on how to market yourself to potential clients or sell yourself again to clients who may have drifted away around March when the world started shutting down. And, they can also give you some inspiration for a new way to conduct your business or add services to it for now, during the pandemic,  and once it eventually comes to an end.

It could mean not just preparing meals for clients but sending the message that their exhaustion in preparing their own meals–and perhaps the same old things–can come to an end with an exciting menu you create for them.

Baja Fish Tacos with Quinoa

For those still anxious (including you) about preparing meals in clients’ homes, it could mean renting time in a commercial kitchen, perhaps a restaurant kitchen that’s reduced hours and could use some income, and then delivery the meals to them. Sometimes the old way doesn’t work all the time.

And then there are those people who you could help by putting together a weekly menu of recipes and sourced ingredients. You could do your own version of a Blue Apron and create a video cookalong to help with technique.

Look above at what you’ve learned about consumers. They don’t like making grocery store trips. They want to eat healthier. They want to prepare meals in advance. They want to try new dishes. How can you not look at this data and project your own business onto it! This is an opportunity a serious personal chef should take advantage of!

How is your personal chef business evolving during the pandemic? What are you learning about consumers during this time?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership. 

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

 

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It’s been a few months since the country locked down. That means we’ve had some time to rethink how we go about serving clients–and if we’re serving clients.

Brian Kasten of the Supper Solution in Vermont and an APPCA member explains, “When I saw this coming I secured a commercial kitchen that was unused and have done a temporary transition for those clients I have that are immune compromised. One day a week I work out of this kitchen to cover those clients and I am the only one allowed in… Plus I spend two hours re-sanitizing before any equipment is moved in. And then afterwards.”

Kathy Dederich of Chef, Please! in Arkansas and also an APPCA member recounts, “We have a man here who was in the process of opening a restaurant…his plans are on hold, but he’s cooking in a church kitchen for the community. The church pays for the food, but they accept donations. In a twist of fate, the American Legion hall decided to sell their building and, rather than build out the initial space he had selected, he’s hoping to take over the hall…which is a much nicer facility. Talk about serendipity!”

On June 3, 2020, Eater published a story about how New York’s fine dining chefs have done a 180 and have been starting entrepreneurial home businesses. Alejandra Nicolon, laid off as a pastry chef from Eleven Madison Park, is now making bagels with her husband Andre Lev Pavlik, formerly sou chef at Tom Colicchio’s FiDi restaurant Temple Court. Daniel Burns, from closed, Michelin-starred restaurant Luksus, is making meals. Kate Telfeyan, formerly the chef de cuisine at Mission Chinese Food is not only making dishes like cumin-spiced lamb and kimchi stew, but she’s delivering them herself by bike.

As a personal chef, you probably find this sounds familiar and perhaps not quite kosher.

“We developed the personal chef concept almost 30 years ago specifically to provide a legitimate alternative career path for professional culinary workers who found it difficult or impossible to work in traditional commercial kitchen situations yet chose to support their families using their culinary skill and expertise,” explains APPCA founder and executive director Candy Wallace. “We worked with state and city governments to develop a template to assist chefs and cooks in setting up and operating legitimate, successful businesses as personal and private chefs which meant operating within the safety and licensing requirements of their particular municipalities so the industry could grow and contribute to the benefit of clients who required or desired the service and the financial stability of the chef owner/operator.”

Candy points out that food preparation in residential kitchens being delivered to client’s homes or businesses is illegal in all 50 states in the U.S. Operating with a municipal or State business license, specific local Food Sanitation certification and Specific General Liability Insurance coverage is also required.

So, if you’re not already a personal chef and certified, please, she says, pay attention to these important requirements before you proceed.

“In our current reality of the Covid-19 virus, cooking for clients in your home or their home at this time is dangerous from a potential virus transfer standpoint but also from a legal vulnerability standpoint. If any of your clients or their extended family members become sick, you are a big target,” Candy emphasizes. “If you have no liability insurance coverage, you are cooked. If the health department or city administration departments in your city or state choose to pursue you, they will, and you will find yourself in a morass of red tape that will prevent your being able to open another business.

“Please think before you act.”

Candy suggests that instead you locate a licensed commercial kitchen and deliver safely and legally from it. Protect yourselves by being aware of local requirements and cover your bases.

“I have been a professional chef, author, educator and advocate for many years, and have dedicated my life to the industry I love,” Candy says. “Please be careful, keep safe, be strong, and be kind, support your colleagues, and most of all, be proud of your craft.”

What have you been doing with your business since the lockdown? Have you discovered some useful workarounds to serve clients?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership. 

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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April Lee

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need.  Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership. 

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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How’s everything going? Are you still able to work with clients or have some cancelled for the shelter-at-home duration?

If you’re using this time to make changes in your business, how about staying in your clients’ line of vision–and the vision of potential clients–by sending out a weekly newsletter?

The newsletter could be as simple as a weekly note via email that checks in on your clients, lets them know what’s going on with you (yeah, you’re not all that busy either but perhaps you’re noodling around with new recipes, working in your garden, starting a cookbook…), shares links to health or food news, and perhaps offers a recipe or two. Just design it so that the content is broken up into easily consumable pieces, bold type where useful, along with bullet points and links.

But that same content could also be part of a more designed, formal e-newsletter, using Constant Contact, BenchmarkCampaignMonitor, MailChimp, or some other platform. Depending on your distribution, these could be free to use or modestly priced.

Each offers templates that allow you to pretty easily create a design. You can set up a format that offers a box for any news you want to promote, such as a guest post for this blog, a new Facebook group you’ve launched, volunteer/community work you’re doing, or a new cooking demo you’ve released on YouTube. You could have another that offers a recipe with a photo. If you have a niche service, like cooking for athletes or expectant moms, you could have a section with relevant health news and links to stories with the details. And, of course, you should have a permanent section that describes who you are, where you are, the services you provide, and how to contact you, etc. Fill it with great photos, but keep enough white space in the design so it doesn’t feel claustrophobic.

When I was still writing my blog, San Diego Foodstuff, I prepared and sent out a weekly e-newsletter using MailChimp to both promote it and my other work as a food writer. I ran an excerpt from the new post on the top left, food community news on the top right (a cookbook author coming to town, classes people I knew were teaching, food events, etc.), and below that a photo and description of my latest story for the San Diego Union-Tribune’s food section with a link to the story. If I had won an award, that was placed on the lower left above the block that had information for how to get in touch with me and then a description of my work. And, of course, I included any advertising I had and a photo of my dogs–because why not? (Also create an easy way for people to unsubscribe because realistically not everyone on your subscription list will want to receive it.)

You should also include any social media links you have: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest.

Why so much information? Because you’re marketing yourself at a time when you need to keep your clients engaged and plant seeds in the minds of potential new ones. Because you may be looking for new opportunities under your personal chef umbrella to teach classes, cater events, write food articles, or be on local television.

You may think, well, I have a half dozen clients. I’m doing fine. Why should I bother writing a weekly newsletter? Well, how about broadening the possibilities and sending it to local news producers, local newspaper editors, or influencers who could help you find new clients or other food-related gigs? If you’re on social media, you can even announce you’re launching a newsletter, describe the type of content you’re planning and encourage people to sign up for it.

These are weird and challenging times. If you and yours are healthy and you can carve out some time, why not design and start sending out a collateral via email that can help you rebound once the world reopens? If you’re concerned about your business, this is another tool in your toolbox to help it come back. And if you’re one of the lucky ones who is still busy, congratulations. But you know you should always be thinking ahead. A weekly newsletter can help you stay at top of mind with those with whom you already have a relationship and launch new relationships with those you want to impress with your skills.

How do you promote your business? Have you been writing a newsletter to clients?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Dennis Nosko and Christine Robinson of A Fresh Endeavor Personal Chef Service

Last week APPCA member and friend Christine Robinson wrote a Facebook post that articulated what so many of us are feeling these days–boredom with the routine at home, irritability with the constraints, and yet a total understanding that it was all necessary. So, I asked Christine who, with her partner Dennis Nosko, operates A Fresh Endeavor Personal Chef Service in Boston, Massachusetts, if she’d like a different challenge, guest writing a post for her fellow personal chefs. I’m so glad she embraced this because what she wrote below is so meaningful!

I had heard from a lifelong friend sometime in mid January that she was concerned about this virus popping up in China and had I heard. I researched the rumblings and decided that it would be a good idea to just prepare a little bit (anyone knows my least little bit is over the top) because we all know when you prepare and over plan, nothing happens.

Spanish-Style Chicken Thighs

Needless to say, here we are. We have been in business for 20 years and have seen downturns, trends, situations, busy times, lean times, but everything always balanced out. This, this is one for the history books as we navigate the biggest challenge our world has faced in recent history.

When everything started hitting we made sure to let clients know how vigilant we were and that we understood their fears. We have had about five clients hang on for the duration, all people who stay at home under most circumstances, have some special needs, and have spacious enough homes that we can practice safe distancing and bring in as few items as possible. Cleaning frantically has become the norm and taking our temperatures and announcing numbers has become second nature. We keep in touch with other clients who have taken this time off to email, trade some recipes and just check in with no mention of business concerns, rather human concerns. We love our people and want to see everyone on the other side.

Right now is the time for our best ideas to be put forth, to brainstorm, to get creative.

I started a Facebook page almost a month ago called ChefDemic—we are just over 250 members. We became concerned with people’s abilities to cook from what they had available in their freezers and pantries, and also wanted to address food waste and using what you have on hand. Our intent is to amp up on demo videos (our son bought us a tripod to use for videos) and to move over to a YouTube platform and continue this. The sense of community on the page is very strong and we have regular posts from members showing off their own creations. When we have not been available to offer advice in a timely manner, 10 odd people will address a member’s concern. Much more than the food advice, is the distraction, the humor, and the support for our members has built a wonderful, creative group.

Mixed Vegetable with Cabbage, Peppers, and Broccolini

This has also spurred talk of online cooking class parties or instruction.

We are taking this time at home to rest our minds, deal with our own health, get out and walk, and allow ourselves to fear the uncertainties, while taking some time to regroup mentally. Menus for clients are being revamped, we are cooking for ourselves, concentrating on balanced meals rooted in foods that boost immunity. I have managed to maintain a 20-pound weight loss I started on shortly after my surgery at the end of October and so has Dennis. Documenting this journey could be another direction we explore.

Filling for Burrito Bowl with Bison and Spinach

As far as the future, our plans are to focus on the very cornerstone of the personal chef industry, something we all know, to sense and execute customized food in the safety of the client’s home with attention to quality personally managed for them. I see a trend of gatherings being more special and possibly more frequent as we are all learning to celebrate the little things, as no one wants to miss out on any moment with loved ones  ever again. I envision a time when the RSVP lists are going to be packed with ‘YES! We will be theres,” and fewer, “Can’t make its.” While that may take time, we are willing to rework our model to fit the client needs.

Be well and be safe. You are our people and we love you, too.

How are you coping with sheltering at home. How are you thinking about adjusting your business for the future?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

 

 

 

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What Brings You Joy as a Personal Chef?

Filed under: Business Strategies , Tags: , , , — Author: Caron Golden , April 6, 2020

As everyone’s all too well aware, we’re caught up in pretty anxious times right now, thanks to the coronavirus outbreak. Your clients are so lucky to have you help them through it with delicious and nutritious meals. We also hope those of you who for various reasons aren’t engaged with your clients right now are taking care of yourselves, sheltering at home, and working on new strategies for re-opening your business.

Back in the day, APPCA’s executive director Candy Wallace created this career path to give chefs an alternative to working a restaurant line–to be able to follow their own joy when it comes to working in a kitchen. Being a personal chef enables professionals to create the kind of business that works for them and their lives–to make food that inspires them, to help others, charge fees they deem appropriate for their services, and create their own hours. Some also elect to take on additional, related opportunities, like catering, teaching, and writing, under their personal chef umbrella.

When everything comes together, we find that chefs are creating a life for themselves that brings them joy. It may be the independence of directing their own business. It may come from their clients in the form of appreciation. It may be pride in what they’re accomplishing creatively. Or it’s the grace of knowing they are helping others.

We’re often in conversation about how to do things better–be more efficient, get more clients, update menus. But can we take a moment and share what brings you joy as a personal chef? We don’t talk about that nearly enough and we surely need it now. We asked participants in our Facebook group and business page what about being a personal chef brings them joy. Here’s what they had to say. Sound familiar?

Jennifer M. Grawburg: “When someone really thanks me for bringing joy to their lives whether it’s a memorable birthday or just easing the everyday grind by providing dinners each week. I’m truly thankful for amazing clients.”

Christina Hamilton Snow: “The smile on the face of a client that with my help, lost 90 lbs and is no longer pre diabetic.”

Dennis Nosko and Christine Robinson of A Fresh Endeavor

Christine H. Robinson: “When a tiny child who hates everything likes something I make….”

Natasha Layne: “When we create tasty and healthy dishes it does something to not only our spirit but to the spirit of the person we’re cooking for. I love taking some degree of stress away from a busy family or a person who’s worked a long hard day.”

Debbie J. Elder: “The chance to meet new people from all over. I focus on private dinner parties for visitors to the city.”

Erin Tripp: “The freedom to work by myself, when I can… and receiving accolades at the end of the night, isn’t so bad either! 

Jim Huff: “Just this week I was stuck at a client’s home waiting for a towing service (stupid chef trick I locked my keys in the car) my client, who I haven’t seen in two months as he started new job, felt so bad for me he offered to heat up some “delicious food” and join him for dinner! Of course he was referring to what I had cooked for him that day! 

Judy Harvey: “My senior clients that look forward to the food, but more so of me sharing 4 hours with them.”

Shelbie Wassel

Shelbie Hafter Wassel: “When a client, two weeks ago gave me a bottle of wine from his collection… retails at $325. Gulp!”

Evangeline Kochanek: “Seeing clients become healthier and feel better 

Julie Handwerker Cicero: “When my client tells me I got her eat vegetables!”

Cammie Read: “When I get texts like ‘I’m sitting here enjoying my children while your food bakes. Thank you for giving me this time’ or when an overwhelmed mom is faced with so many allergies to eliminate and texts ‘thank you for taking his allergies and still creating food for us without missing a beat. You rock!’ I am honored to cook for so many wonderful families. My favorite one from a client ‘i appreciate you.’ It means so much to just feel appreciated.”
Heather Raymond McFadden: “I love when I get the chance to see my clients enjoy the healthy food I make. Their expressions say more than any words 
At APPCA we love that we can support all personal chefs achieve their goals and find joy in their work. Please let us know if there’s something we can do to help you, especially now!
What brings you joy as a personal chef? What do you hope to achieve in the future?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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So, what week of the coronavirus shut down are we in? I’m losing track. How about you? What I do know is that many of us have lost work and are trying to hold things together–both financially and emotionally. So, here’s a suggestion: put your talent to work in a different way and hold online cooking classes.

Already I’m hearing about APPCA members trying this out. In fact, member Shelbie Hafter Wassel shot me a message inviting me to take a look at her new video on Facebook, which she later uploaded to YouTube, shot by her husband Jerry. Here she offers a couple of recipes for making fish. Check it out!

So, here’s what I’m thinking. You have clients. You have recipes. You may have limited access to groceries but no doubt you have a fridge and freezer packed with food. Why not learn to use a new technology while you have some down time, engage your current clients, social media promote the heck of your video classes to get new ones when this crisis ends–and maybe even make some money while you’re at it?

Money? You can earn money making a video? Well, there are at least half a dozen platforms that could enable you to earn some money holding online cooking classes. Let’s discuss.

Skype: You probably are already familiar with Skype. So, why not use it for an interactive online cooking class? You can charge a fee and share recipes for the class ahead of time so your participants can follow along. Maybe you teach a knife skills class with recipes based on various skills you teach. Or perhaps you create a meal kit for clients and include this interactive online class to teach them how to use it?

Google Hangouts Chat: You can do the same thing on Google Hangouts Meet as with Skype. Take a look at this invite from San Diego chef Jason Roehm, who regularly teaches via this platform. The class is live, followed by recipes. He charges $25 for a two-hour class and sells the tickets via a link to Eventbrite.

Patreon: Here’s how this website describes itself: “Patreon powers membership businesses for creators by giving them the tools they need to acquire, manage, and energize their paying patrons. With a subscription-style payment model, fans pay their favorite creators a monthly amount of their choice in exchange for exclusive access, extra content, or a closer look into their creative journey.”

As The Street describes it, “Patreon is a crowdfunding platform that enables fans (or patrons) to pay and support artists for their work. For producers of videos, webcomics, music, podcasts and more, Patreon is a way to earn extra money on what might otherwise be free content, and allows fans to contribute to their favorite artist’s platform.”

The site allows creators to set up monthly, subscription-style payment tiers. Creators can also charge an upfront payment instead–and that remains permanent. Your “patrons” can join by creating an account and pledging money to you, with subscription options sorted by different payment tiers or per-post options for content. According to their site, Patreon takes 5% of the amount paid to creators in fees. Creators keep some 90% of their revenues, with an additional 5% going to transaction fees.

Vēmos: Vēmos allows creators to host interactive classes that enable participate to engage with you. You can sell tickets to attend your virtual class to earn income from your home. Vēmos uses Stripe Connect. This allows ticket sales to be deposited directly into your account as soon as sales role in. They don’t charge a monthly subscription fee. Instead, a 10 percent fee is added to the consumer buying the ticket, with a maximum fee of $9.95 per ticket. You select the price point for each ticket for the class. Vēmos has a step-by-step guide for starting an event.

Zoom: I hate to say it, but if you haven’t heard of Zoom in the last few weeks you’ve been living under a rock (and probably safer there). Zoom has become the default platform for video conferencing for the coronavirus shelter at home worker. But why not make it work for you for earning some money with virtual cooking classes? It’s free. It’s easy to sign up. Perhaps use Eventbrite to sell tickets and then you can round up your students at the time you teach the class.

Now you may not make a ton of money doing this, but every little bit can help. Plus, you learn a new tool and can flex your muscles working on a new angle to promote yourself and your business.

Have you started doing video cooking classes? What’s your experience been like?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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