Radish Greens Pesto

Radish Greens Pesto

We promised you that we’d keep you posted on 2017 culinary forecasts. Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants just released its Third Annual Culinary & Cocktails Trend Forecast. And while this is more or less directed toward restaurants, personal chefs are also at the forefront of cool new stuff in the kitchen for weekly clients as well as catering events and teaching classes.

The forecast findings were uncovered via an extensive survey of leading chefs, sommeliers, general managers and bartenders from 70+ acclaimed Kimpton restaurants, bars and lounges across 30+ U.S. cities. New this year, the report also includes insights from renowned food influencers, photographers and videographers. These culinary and cocktail aficionados partnered with Kimpton to create original content via videos, recipes and images, to showcase their unique take on interesting forecast findings. You can find them at this website.

“When it comes to culinary trends, Kimpton chefs and bartenders are on the hunt for the flavors and techniques that tantalize taste buds and expand diners’ culinary universe. They’re true trendsetters and innovators in our kitchens and bars,” said Alex Taylor, Kimpton’s senior vice president of restaurants & bars. “These are the most creative and cutting-edge culinary concepts that will pepper menus and home kitchens in the coming year.”

Kimpton.2017.C.C.Trends.Infographic

So, here’s what they’re predicting:

Top Culinary Trends:

  • A surge in Mediterranean-inspired dishes like creamy sesame hummus with braised chickpeas, olive oil charred octopus, and Moroccan spiced lamp chops with tomato-cucumber fattoush and lemon yogurt
  • New twists on favorite childhood desserts like boozy berry sundaes with blackberry chartreuse and sour cherry mascarpone-flavored frozen push-ups
  • Ongoing interest in using the whole beast to create rich, flavorful dishes like oven-roasted bone marrow burgers, chicken skin chips crusted with quinoa and marcona almonds, braised pork neck ragout pappardelle, and cheekily named pig face candy bars with country style pâté and raw sugar brulée
  • The sustainability-driven “root to leaf” movement that embraces using vegetables in their entirety in dishes like radish greens, carrot top pesto, salt roasted beets, and celery root purées
  • More lean meat alternatives popping onto menus to be featured in dishes like smoked elk carpaccio and venison tartare as well as ox, bison, boar, ostrich for the more adventurous diner
  • Spices like cardamom, cumin and turmeric that add an extra kick to any dish.

Leading Cocktail Trends:

  • Adding a culinary twist to classic cocktails with unique ingredients like roasted grapes, salt-roasted plantains, smoked tomato water, puréed red pepper, snap peas, corn, or even pickling brine to create either sweet or savory culinary cocktails
  • South American-inspired cocktails like a Caipirinha using mezcal, cachaça, jalapeño-infused cachaça, serrano chili syrup or pisco
  • Fat-washing cocktails with alternative non-meat-based fats like milk, coconut and peanut butter
  • Wine and cheese remain the top food and drink pairing, but fresh new combinations like oysters and gin or sherry and fries will emerge as chefs and bartenders collaborate more on tasting menus and small plates
  • Signature cocktails developed out of fermented beverages like Kombucha, ginger beer and coconut kefir for creations like a cranberry and tangerine Kombucha cocktail

What culinary trends have you been noticing that you’re gearing up for in 2017? Anything you’re dreading?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Turkey Roulade

For many of us Thanksgiving is our favorite holiday. Why? Most likely because we gather with people we care about over a great meal–without the pressure of exchanging gifts.

That’s not to say there aren’t other pressures, especially if you’re a personal chef and catering the holiday. Over the years we’ve written a lot on Thanksgiving–offering tips and recipes. So, for this Thanksgiving week post how about we revisit a few of these posts? Below are links to our best Thanksgiving tips and recipes. And at the end is a recipe for a multi-grain salad that can be a great side dish for the holiday meal–and easily be adapted for the vegetarians and vegans at the holiday table.

Chef Suzy Brown's roasted Thanksgiving goose

Chef Suzy Brown’s roasted Thanksgiving goose

Straddling the Holiday Service Dilemma: Can you possibly take on a catering gig or do extra cooking for Thanksgiving for clients and not fall asleep at your own holiday table? It’s a classic personal chef tug of war but APPCA’s founder and executive director Candy Wallace has some pointed suggestions for making this work so you can get the best of both worlds–provide your clients with service and enjoy the holiday yourself.

Prepping

Beth Volpe’s Thanksgiving Turkey Two Ways: Undecided about how to prepare your turkey/s or how to get the dinner on the table so you can enjoy it with your loved ones? APPCA member Beth Volpe of Savory Eats figured out a way to make her Thanksgiving meal two days before so that she would have the holiday to enjoy with her family. “I make a brined, butterflied turkey, the gravy, the dressing, and the cranberry sauce the day before. Come Thanksgiving Day, all I do is slide my turkey in the oven and pour myself a glass of wine.” Beth offers her method of brining the turkey and has an additional recipe for a sensational turkey roulade.

Turkey Stuffing Muffins-small

Turkey Stuffing Muffins and Cranberry Chutney: Just when you thought you couldn’t come up with a new way to approach stuffing someone turns it into muffins. What a cool idea! You could certainly do with your own favorite, traditional stuffing, but take a look at this recipe from the Art Institute of California-San Diego. And pair it with this divine cranberry chutney!

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Now how about a Thanksgiving dish that’s also healthy? Grains are always a favorite of mine and grain salads are a no brainer–but have you thought of combining grains in a salad?

Creating a multi-grain salad means you get a more interesting combination of flavors and textures, not to mention colors. It all depends of what you mix together. I love the chew of red wheat berries. They’re perfect with robust vegetables like winter squash and thick-cut portobello mushroom. Quinoa is more delicate and colorful and works well with fruit, red peppers, cheese, beans, and cucumbers. Farro’s nuttiness fits somewhere in the middle. I enjoy combining it with roasted cauliflower, tomatoes, and lots of herbs.

I decided to mix these three up together and add fruit in the form of fuyu persimmons and some beans–garbanzo and edamame–for color, texture, and sweetness. I got some crunch from toasted walnuts and pecans.

A word of advice, here. Combining grains doesn’t at all mean cooking them together. It’s a little extra work, but you must cook each grain type separately. If you don’t, you risk getting mush instead of the individual textures and flavors you’re after.

Also feel free to mix together your own combinations of whole grains. Consider barley, brown rice, kamut, and spelt, among others. And all sorts of other seasonal vegetables, beans, fruits, nuts, seeds, and herbs will work well, too. This recipe should be inspiration to create a dish based on what you enjoy and what you find in the markets.

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Three-Grain Salad with Persimmons, Beans, and Nuts
Serves 6 to 8

1/2 cup farro
1/2 cup quinoa
1/2 cup wheat berries
3 1/2 cups chicken broth (or water/vegetable broth for vegetarians)
1/ cup red onion, diced
2 Fuyu persimmons, chopped
1 cup cooked edamame beans (available at Trader Joe’s)
1/2 cup cooked garbanzo beans
1/2 cup walnut pieces, toasted
1/2 cup pecan halves, toasted
1 tablespoon Mexican tarragon, chopped

Sherry Vinaigrette
Yield: 1 cup

1/4 cup sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 clove garlic, minced
pinch sugar
pinch salt
pinch ground pepper
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

Cook each grain according to directions. For the farro and quinoa, the proportions are like rice: 2 to 1 water to grain. Bring the stock or water to the boil, add the grains, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for about 25 minutes. You’re looking for the stock or water to be absorbed and the grains to still have a little chewiness. For wheat berries, it’s more like 3 to 1 with a longer cooking time, more like 35 to 40 minutes. It’s okay if the water isn’t fully absorbed as long as the grains are cooked and are a little al dente.

In a large bowl combine the grains with the rest of the salad ingredients.

To make the vinaigrette, mix together the vinegar, mustard, garlic, sugar, salt, and pepper. Gradually whisk in the olive oil. Whisk until the dressing has emulsified. Pour enough into the salad to coat the ingredients, but not so much that in drenches it. Serve at room temperature.

Wishing all of our members and friends the happiest of Thanksgivings! We are so grateful to you!

What will you be doing for Thanksgiving? Catering? Enjoying time with friends and family? Both?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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FullSizeRender

Can you believe that Thanksgiving is in less than two weeks? In Southern California, it may be November but as of this writing we’re sweating it out in a heat wave–and turkey and all the fixings seem like a strange meal to be preparing. But it’s here and maybe the grill is better than the oven for the big bird.

If you’re catering your first Thanksgiving and feeling a little dread, relax. Do what you’re so good at as a personal chef: prepare. APPCA’s founder and executive director Candy Wallace is a firm believer in streamlining holiday gigs to keep them from becoming overwhelming. You’ve already done your client assessment, so you know what foods your client and their guests can eat or need to avoid before you planned your menu. And, we’re going to assume that if the meal needs to be vegetarian or vegan, you’ve got experience in that milieu.

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So, really, the biggest things to do are advanced planning and shopping along with mindful prep. With that in mind, Candy offers seven tips to make your Thanksgiving week easier:

  • Make turkey stock to be used in multiple dishes in advance of your event. Roast vegetables and puree in advance to have for a gravy base.
  • Measure and prepackage everything to be used in assembling your recipes. You’ve got that down, of course. Personal chefs are the experts in food packaging and meal storage for clients. But this time, use your skills to set up efficient and smooth assembly of components used to prepare the holiday meal your clients are looking forward to.
  • Are you baking cornbread? Then be sure to pre-measure all dry ingredients, then package and label them. Do the same with the wet ingredients. Same with stuffing.
  • If you’re making cranberry relish, again, pre-measure the berries, dried cherries, etc. and package and label them separately from the liquid components, which you’ll also package. Assemble the relish on the day of service.
  • Vegetables can take a lot of prep. So get that done ahead of time, including any blanching, shocking, and cooling so you can store them and make the recipes with little fuss on the day of the meal. Do the same with your herbs and spices–prep, measure, and store them. If you’re using the same herbs and spices for different dishes, separate them for each dish and mark them.Haricot verte, Escondido FM
  • Clean and prep your bird ahead of time. If you’re dealing with a frozen turkey, be sure you give it enough time to thaw in the fridge. If you’re going to do a wet or dry brine, you’ll need to start that process within a couple of days of the holiday.
  • If space on the stove or in the oven is limited, identify the dishes that can be cooked in advance, frozen, and then reheated for the meal. Many pies–apple and pecan, for instance, as well as stuffing, sweet potatoes, and mashed potatoes–can be made ahead of time, wrapped well, and frozen to be reheated briefly in the oven or (except the pies) in the microwave.

Working a day or even several days ahead will save you time, and keep you sane and strong on Thanksgiving and other holiday service. Hey, do it right and you will still be able to enjoy the day yourself!

Happy Thanksgiving!

What dishes are on your Thanksgiving menu for clients? What tips can you share to make holiday catering more manageable?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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apple crisp1

When you have type 2 diabetes dessert can be a tricky thing. What everyone immediately fixates on is the sugar. But sugar is really a foil for something larger, which, of course, is carbohydrates. And all carbs are equal when it comes to diabetes management. The other component just as important in managing diabetes is fat. For most of us, our weight is what brought us head to head with the disease. Keeping weight in check through a healthy, low-fat diet along with exercise—and managing blood sugar through carb control—is what will help clients stay healthy in the long run.

So, as we head into the holiday season, where does dessert fall into a healthy diet as you start writing menus for clients? Dessert is an indulgence, a part of the pleasure of a day. But the person with diabetes has to plan for it. My experience has been that it’s all about moderation and portion control—and they’re not necessarily the same thing.

Moderation includes portion control but it also means being discriminating in what you eat. In the context of dessert, for me it means looking for sweets that are mostly made with real fruit or dark chocolate. It means seeking out desserts that are airy—made with lots of egg whites, like angel food cake and sponge cake—which cuts down on the density and carb count. Or simply desserts which call for less sugar than conventional recipes. This is when you need to consult with clients about what this means for them.

Portion control can be tricky. So, you might look for desserts that are by their nature single portion: chocolate mousse servings in a small ramekin, a single piece of dark chocolate, a small honey crisp apple, a bowl of fresh berries. If they want a whole pie or cake you can slice it into individual portions, wrap them, and put them in the freezer. Same with cookies or muffins.

3 kinds of strawberries

I know there are a lot of people who look for sugar-free choices. But what you have to remember about sugar-free options is that they aren’t necessarily lower in fat or carbs. And they usually include chemicals you clients may not want to consume. Yes, there are healthier sugar-free options; honey and maple syrup are favorites and many people love stevia. For a long time, agave nectar was considered a good alternative to sugar but doctors like Andrew Weil are now concerned about the impact of high fructose and are discouraging its use.

You can also figure out workarounds for some sweet treats. For instance, if I want to make a mocha, instead of carb-laden chocolate syrup, I use a couple of teaspoons of honey mixed with a teaspoon or so cocoa powder and some 1 percent milk in a large mug of coffee. It suits me fine and the carb count is much lower.

Your clients may also enjoy desserts that substitute conventional high fat or high sugar ingredients to create a flavorful but healthier result. Here are some suggestions from Fitness Magazine.

But sometimes your clients just want what they want and you have to figure out how to make it work. I love apple pie. If I make one, yes, I’ll have a small slice. But I also discovered that I could make a crisp and by reducing the amount of butter, sugar, and flour—and eating small portions—I could have something healthier since it’s just topping cooked fruit, not encasing it. I keep the bag of crisp mixture in the freezer, pulling out a handful at a time to top a sliced apple or cup of berries. You can do the same for clients.

In the bigger picture, dessert doesn’t and can’t stand alone. In the course of a day, the person working to manage diabetes has to count carbs. If your type 2 diabetic clients allow themselves three servings of carbs in a meal at 15 grams of carbs per serving, you have 45 grams to work with. That needs to include dessert. So, let’s say you want to have a portion of the Cannoli Cream Napoleon in the recipe below. Each serving of that is 11 carbs. That gives you 34 grams of carbs for the rest of the meal. That could be a couple of servings of whole grains with a protein like chicken or fish and low-carb vegetables, like greens. In other words you have to create balance to make it all work so that your weight and blood sugar stay down.

In fact, it’s all about balance. Balancing carb portions, balancing fat and calories, balancing exercise with relaxation, balancing indulgence with healthy choices. Dessert isn’t something your clients have to cut out so much as balance with everything else they’re doing to stay healthy.

Cannoli Cream Napoleon
Prevention Diabetes Diet Cookbook
By the Editors of America’s Leading Healthy Lifestyle Magazine with Ann Fittante, MS, RD
Makes 8 servings

11 grams carbohydrate

Ingredients
4 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar, divided + 1 teaspoon for garnish
3 sheets frozen whole wheat or regular phyllo dough, thawed
Vegetable oil in a spray bottle
1 ½ cups part-skim ricotta cheese
2 teaspoons grated orange peel
1/8 teaspoon orange extract
¼ cup natural pistachios, coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder (optional)

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Transfer 2 tablespoons of the sugar to a small fine sieve, sifter, or dredger. On a work surface, lay out 1 sheet of dough so the shorter sides of the rectangle are left and right. Cut from top to bottom into 4 equal rectangles. Coat the top of 1 rectangle very lightly with vegetable oil. Dust very lightly with confectioners’ sugar. Stack a second small rectangle on top of the first. Coat the top of the second rectangle very lightly with vegetable oil. Dust very lightly with confectioners’ sugar. Repeat the procedure with the remaining 2 small rectangles. Spray and dust the top layer. Carefully transfer the pastry to a large nonstick baking sheet. Repeat cutting and layering with the remaining 2 whole sheets of phyllo dough to make 2 other layered pastries. Bake for about 7 minutes or until crisp and browned. Let stand to cool.
  2. In a bowl, combine the ricotta, 2 tablespoons sugar, orange peel, and extract. Stir with a wooden spoon until smooth. Place one of the reserved pastry on a rectangular serving plate or tray. Spread with half of the ricotta mixture. Sprinkle on half of the pistachios. Cover with the second pastry, the remainder of the ricotta mixture, and the remaining nuts. Top with the remaining pastry. In a small fine sieve, sifter, or dredger, combine the remaining teaspoon sugar with the cocoa powder, if using. Sift over the top of the Napoleon. Cut with a serrated knife.

Note: This dessert is at its finest when served immediately after assembly, but it can be refrigerated, uncovered, for about 1 ½ hours without becoming soggy. Alternatively, you can bake the pastry and store it in a cool, dry spot for up to 24 hours. Prepare the ricotta mixture; cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Assemble just before serving.

What kinds of modifications have you made for clients with type 2 diabetes? How do you manage dessert?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Autumn Braised Chicken

Filed under: Recipes , Tags: — Author: Caron Golden , October 31, 2016

braised mediterranean chicken-2

Do you have a favorite fall comfort dish? Mine is braised chicken. The chicken is transformed into melt-in-your-mouth bites by braising in vegetables that release their juices, along with the fragrant herbs and smokiness from the dry Marsala I usually add. The added bonus is the sweet aroma the kitchen takes on when it’s cooking. It just makes me feel good to be home.

I make this dish many ways, depending on what I’m craving and what ingredients I have, so this is hugely versatile for satisfying the various preferences of clients. Braised chicken is so easy and so versatile you almost don’t need a recipe. What you do need is the chicken, of course, some vegetables, herbs, spices, and white wine. I veer from tomatoes, red peppers, garlic, onions, and leeks to marinated artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, capers, and fennel. Do your clients love carrots and celery? Add them. Winter squash? Eggplant? Go for it. Sometimes I’ll bread the chicken, otherwise I’ll just sprinkle the pieces with salt and black pepper. I like to include dried herbs like oregano, marjoram, and thyme. If I want heat, I’ll add diced chiles or crushed red pepper flakes. Most often I turn to Marsala or sherry, but if I have an open bottle of Pinot Grigio or Chardonnay, in that will go. I usually make this just for myself. Two pieces turns into two meals for me. But I’ve made it for six people with a dozen pieces and just added more ingredients to a larger pot. No problem. You may just need to brown the chicken in batches and cook the dish longer.

Braised chicken takes about an hour in a 375° oven. You can use a clay pot (don’t preheat in that case so the pot won’t crack from the shock of the heat) or a heavy metal pot, like a Le Creuset Dutch oven. Whatever you use needs to be oven ready in terms of the handles and lid top for metal pots and pots that can absorb higher heat for clay.

browning skin

Prep your veggies. Then add some olive oil to the pot on the stove and add your seasoned chicken in batches, skin side down, with enough space between them so they don’t steam. Let the skin brown–don’t pull the chicken from the bottom of the pot. Wait to turn the pieces until they lift easily. Brown the second side and remove. Repeat with the next batch until done.

browning bottom

Place the chicken skin side up back in the pot and start layering half the vegetables. Once you have one layer in, add half the seasonings. Add the rest of the vegetables, the rest of the seasonings, and your wine. If your clients don’t drink wine, you can add a little apple juice or chicken broth.

ready for oven

Turn off the heat, cover the pot, and place it in the oven to cook for an hour. Serve it over grains–I made farro for it this week–so you have something to absorb the sweet and salty juices. Make enough for a second meal. It tastes even better the next night!

Just out of oven

Braised Chicken with Mediterranean Flavors
Serves 4

4 tablespoons olive oil
8 chicken thighs
Salt and pepper to taste
2 onions, thinly sliced
8 large cloves of garlic, peeled and sliced
2 dozen or more pitted Kalamata olives
2 dozen quartered marinated artichoke hearts
1 tablespoon dried marjoram
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme
crushed red pepper flakes
12 ounces Marsala

Place a rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat to 375°.

Heat olive oil in a heavy, oven-ready pot that has a lid.

Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Place a few of the chicken pieces skin side down in the pot. Let brown. Turn only once the chicken easily lifts from the bottom of the pot. Let brown on the second side. Remove and repeat with the next batch. When all are cooked, return, skin side up, to the pot.

Layer half the onion, garlic, olives, and artichoke hearts over the chicken. Sprinkle with half the herbs and sprinkle in some crushed red pepper flakes. Add a pinch of salt and pepper. Layer in the rest of the onion, garlic, olives, and artichoke hearts. Add the rest of the herbs, more crushed red pepper flakes if you like, and salt and pepper. Drizzle the Marsala over the mixture.

Put the cover on the pot and place in the oven. Cook for about an hour.

What’s your favorite cool weather comfort food for clients?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Making Changes in 2017? Tell Your Clients Now!

Filed under: Business Strategies , Tags: , , , , — Author: Caron Golden , October 24, 2016

happy-new-year-party-banner-2017

Time passes so quickly–and 2017 will be here before you know it. Hopefully, you’ve been thinking ahead about the next year and any changes you want to implement.

Like price increases. Yeah, that. Have your costs gone up? Many of you have clients pay for food directly, but for those of you who don’t, you need to take a look at your bills and figure out where you are today compared to a year ago. The same goes for expenses like gas, insurance, equipment costs, labor–anything you’re paying for that’s business related. Do your calculations and then inform your clients by the end of this month of your price increase.

No, this isn’t easy, but Candy Wallace, APPCA’s founder and executive director, says the best way to do this is in a letter. Be graceful about it, thanking your clients for allowing you to serve them during 2016. Then announce any changes in service or pricing that will be effective January 1, 2017.

Dom Petrov Ossetra and Hackleback (r)1

You can also take advantage of this communication, she adds, by announcing any special service or foods you’ll be offering during the holidays. This can be a wonderful way to bring in some additional income–through catering holiday parties, cocktail parties, brunches, or receptions or offering special holiday treats. Do you make amazing cooking? Offer to make them for your clients. You can prep cookie dough or appetizers, or desserts and have them frozen and ready to bake off at the last minute. Just price everything out, including how you’ll package them, and include a price card with your letter.

Try to get events booked by the end of October for November and early November for December. The same for any extra baking or cooking you’ll do for clients. You may need to hire extra labor for events and extra cooking so you’ll need time to book that as well as any unscheduled kitchen time if you rent kitchen space.

Kale and sweet potatoes

Kale and sweet potatoes

This is also a good time to think about changes in the focus of the service you want to provide in 2017. Have you developed any new passions for a specific type of food or an interest in serving a specific demographic? This could be young families, older adults with medical conditions, or special diets in which you’ve developed an expertise? If so, add that to your letter. It’s a good way to market your services with people you’ve known and who value what you do. Alternately, it could be a way to gracefully segue from one client base to another.

Anticipating a new year also is a good time to take stock of your happiness quotient. We advocate the personal chef career as a lifestyle as well as professional option. Are you a parent of young children who wants to take more time with them? Are you interested in pursuing more education or travel? Are you reaching a point in your life in which you don’t want to work as many hours? Whatever it is, again, this is the time to chart your course for 2017 and use this letter to let your clients know if those changes will impact them.

As we hurtle towards year’s end, taking the time to focus on business and life basics and implementing changes to help you meet your goals is top priority. If you have any questions, be sure to reach out to Candy for help!

What are the professional changes you’re considering for 2017? 

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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The first of the food prognostications for 2017 has been published. Sterling-Rice Group has identified 10 of what they call Cutting-Edge Culinary Trends for 2017. Here they are:

  1. Wake + Cake: Dessert no longer is served only after dinner. They cite two studies to justify dessert for breakfast. The first is from Syracuse University, which says a daily dose of chocolate improves cognitive abilities, such as memory and abstract reasoning. Tel Aviv University found that eating dessert after breakfast could help people lose weight.
    Jennifer Zirkle cake1
  2. Dosha Dining: The mainstays of Indian culture are spreading to the States. They cite the spice turmeric as an example, noting that turmeric serves as a consumer conduit into the ancient practice of Ayurveda, a holistic science focused on physical and emotional balance. Consumers will learn more about their doshas, or natural constitutions, and gravitate toward foods and practices that provide balance, reduce inflammation, and improve energy and stamina. Among the things to look for are dosha bars–three flavors corresponding to the three doshas (pitta, vata, and kapha); turmeric tonic, available as tonic shots and tea, to restore balance; and dosha pops, candy made as a cureall from herbal tea.
  3. Plant Butchery: We’ve cited this trend on our Facebook page. As Sterling-Rice Group notes, a new breed of butcher shops is emerging that caters to both vegans and meat lovers. Not only will display cases feature cuts of meat and chicken, but also plant-based mock versions of chicken, ham, meatballs, steak, and charcuterie. These plant-based foods go beyond seitan and soybean, but also feature chickpeas, corn, peas, legumes, and fungi.

    "Faux" Reuben

    “Faux” Reuben

  4. Food Waste Frenzy: We’ve also talked about this. What was once considered trash (stems, skins, pulp) are not products to be utilized. Think watermelon rinds, riced cauliflower stems, chips and burgers from discarded juice pulp, and vegan leather made from pineapple leaves.

    Charred leek greens salt

    Charred leek greens salt

  5. Snackin’ Sardines: Consumers, said Sterling-Rice Group, continue to fish for protein-rich snacks. Recent interest in Basque cuisine and the rise of Portugal as the newest destination for culinary and global exploration will drive sardines to the forefront. High in omega-3s, protein, and umami flavor, sardines simply served on crusty toast with lemon, garlic, and aioli make for an uncomplicated yet elegant addition to any snacking situation.
  6. Noodle on This: Noodles! It’s not just for spaghetti. Asian noodle traditions are becoming American favorites as consumers seek more authentic experiences. So we have Thai pad see ew, Vietnamese pho, and fresh Japanese ramen. Chinese lamian, or hand-pulled noodles, adds another layer of both taste and visual showmanship. Customers slurp their share while watching a master noodle-smith knead, stretch, and swing dough into strands for soup.
  7. Mocktail Mixology: Have clients who don’t care for alcohol? A category of upscale mixologist-created mocktails are being shaken and stirred for those who don’t care to drink alcohol every time they dine. Alternatives to the old standby of club soda and lime feature fresh-pressed juices, flavored teas, sipping vinegars, and macerated and muddled herbs, spices, and fruits. From nonalcoholic happy hours to standalone mocktail menus, beverages are being positioned as unique experiences that can be enjoyed sans the hangover. (Our favorites? Aged sherry vinegar from Spain and homemade shrubs)

    Berry Shrub1a

    Berry shrub with seltzer

  8. Goat! Get It!: Goat is the next go-to protein, says Sterling-Rice Group. Goats have a high ratio of interstitial collagen (the stuff bone broth devotees are bonkers over). The meat is also low in calories, fat, and cholesterol. Already 63 percent of the world is eating goat. It can be a great foundation for spicy and sour preparations, can be kosher and halal, and is sustainable to raise.
  9. Cook + Connect: The saying “sharing is caring” rings true with chefs, home cooks, and foodies alike who are taking advantage of the sharing economy, says Sterling-Rice Group. Smartphone apps like Eatwith and “Etsy for dinner” app Umi Kitchen connect eager eaters with communal dining experiences. And the fleet-farming movement allows others to farm your lawn in exchange for the opportunity to sell most of the produce.
  10. Migratory Meals: All over the world people are relocating, some by choice, others under duress. While host countries continue to face challenges associated with helping refugee populations, one area where these different groups are finding common ground is food, according to Sterling-Rice Group. By celebrating their unique cultural heritages and cuisines, refugee populations are beginning to carve out their own culinary connections with their new home countries. Look for menus that highlight cuisine with herbs and fresh flowers, orange blossoms, cardamom, fenugreek, sumac, pistachio, and pomegranates. Sounds familiar to those of us who live in San Diego, where multiple refugee populations have long settled and introduced older residents to new cuisines. Check out local markets to incorporate new-to-you ingredients into your dishes.

    Afghan sweet bread

    Afghan sweet bread

This is just the first of what will surely be many more prognostications for 2017’s culinary scene. We’ll keep you posted as we discover them.

What are some of the culinary trends you’re beginning to see in your region? Please share them with us below!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Blintz Casserole to Break the Fast

Filed under: Recipes , Tags: , , , , — Author: Caron Golden , October 10, 2016

Casserole

Tonight is Kol Nidre, the evening before the Jewish High Holiday of Yom Kippur. Those of you with Jewish clients may know that the holiday requires fasting from sundown tonight to sundown tomorrow night. Traditionally it’s a way to concentrate the mind on praying for forgiveness for the sins committed the previous year and asking to be written in the Book of Life for the coming year.

At sundown, Jews then gather with family and friends to break the fast. The meal is usually a collection of fish and dairy dishes. In our family, lox and bagels intermixed with baked salmon, egg salad, chilled marinated vegetables, various dips served with raw veggies or bagel chips, noodle kugel, and blintzes.

My grandmother Tillie taught me how to make blintzes when I was a teenager and one of her specialties was this blintz casserole, which she would serve to break the fast. I’ve always loved this dish. It’s a little reminiscent of a soufflé. You make the blintzes–here with ricotta cheese–and then pack them into a single layer in a casserole dish. Over the blintzes you pour a rich sauce made with eggs, sour cream, a little sugar and vanilla, and orange juice. Thanks to the eggs, the sauce puffs up and browns around the blintzes, which have also cooked and form layers of crepe and cheese.

The creaminess and sweetness from the cheeses make for pure comfort food. You can make the blintzes and serve them on their own or as part of this casserole, both of which freeze beautifully. And while, yes, they’re the perfect break the fast food, they’re also just right for brunch–and you can also fill the blintzes with applesauce or berries or preserves (think blueberry or sour cherry, say) instead of cheese. Also, here I used ricotta because it’s easy to find. But hoop or farmer cheese are more traditional. Serve the casserole plain or with your favorite jams.

Tillie’s Blintz Casserole
Serves 12

Ingredients
Blintzes:
3 eggs, beaten slightly
1 1/2 cups water
1 teaspoon sugar
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons canola oil

2 eggs
1 pound ricotta cheese
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon sugar or to taste

Casserole:
12 blintzes
6 eggs, beaten
1 1/2 cup sour cream
4 tablespoons fresh orange juice
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

To make the blintzes: Make the crepes by beating the 3 eggs slightly. Add the water and teaspoon of sugar and beat together. Slowly beat in the flour until smooth. A few lumps are okay.

Crepe batter

Set out a plate covered with wax paper. Heat a skillet and brush it lightly with canola oil. Using a 2-ounce ladle, scoop in some batter and drop it into the skillet. Tilt the pan all around so the batter forms a circle around 7 inches in diameter. Don’t worry about perfection. This is a homey dish.

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Return the skillet to the heat and let the crepe cook until the edges curl up slightly and the surface is cooked entirely–you won’t be flipping them to cook on the other side. Use a spatula to help you turn out the crepe onto the wax paper on the plate. Then brush the pan again and repeat until you use up all the batter. You should have a dozen crepes. You can make these a day ahead. Just cover the crepes and store in the refrigerator.

To make the filling, blend together the 2 eggs, ricotta, cinnamon, and sugar.

Forming blintz

Make the blintzes by placing 2 tablespoons of the filling in the center of the crepe. Fold the bottom half over the filling. Then fold the sides in. Then fold the top down over the center.

At this point, you now have blintzes and could just fry them in butter and enjoy them with sour cream or jam or applesauce.

For the casserole, preheat the over to 350˚ F. Place each blintz seam side down in a buttered casserole dish.

Mix together the eggs, sour cream, orange juice, sugar, and vanilla.

ready for the oven

Pour the melted butter over the blintzes, then pour the filling over the blintzes to cover. Bake at 350˚ F for an hour.

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What are your clients’ favorite brunch dishes?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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IMG_6525

No doubt you’re seeing an explosion of advertising from easy meal prep businesses and your eyes are rolling or perhaps you’re even panicking just a little. Well, Candy Wallace, APPCA’s founder and executive director, is going to talk you off the ledge– if you’re on it. Read why she is adamant that these businesses are no challenge to you:

Here we go again…Almost 10 years ago personal chefs were concerned with potential competition from the “Easy Prep” meal preparation locations such as Super Suppers, Dream Dinners, Dinner Studios, to name a few, popping up all over the U.S.

APPCA said, don’t worry; these franchised “assemble your own dinners” and take them back to your home don’t provide the level of customized meal service prepared from all fresh ingredients to the client’s taste, often in the safety of the client’s own kitchen. In fact, the easy prep meals were assembled from components that came right off the back of a big food service delivery truck and were more often than not pre-prepared components that contained fillers, stabilizers and preservatives, soups that were re-constituted, and sauces that came in cans. NOT the guarantee of all fresh ingredients supplied and shopped for daily by personal chefs and prepared from scratch for their client’s enjoyment.

The easy prep fad came and went fairly quickly and the personal chef career path continued to grow and thrive. This year will mark the 24th year of the introduction of the personal chef career path in the culinary industry. APPCA is proud to have been responsible for its growth, validation as a legitimate culinary career path by the ACF, for having published the definitive textbook for the industry, and for having co-created professional certification for private and personal chefs through the third-party certification partnership with ACF. It has been an exciting time for personal chefs who had the courage to leave the traditional career choices and strike out on their own to build a culinary business of their own that allowed them to support their families and loved ones by cooking, but also allowed them to create a business of their own with the ability to control their own professional destiny.

Now we have several new players on the field and it will be interesting to see how they play out.

In the box_edited-1

The first new twist is similar to the easy prep premise, but differs in that the components for the recipes that are provided are delivered to the client’s doorstep. Some of these new delivery companies are Blue Apron, Fresh Direct, and Plated. The customer gets most of the ingredients, but still has to prep and prepare each meal using the supplied recipe; the only difference between this business and your customer’s everyday life is simple; they don’t have to shop at the grocery store for ingredients.

I am trying to see the big advantage to the customer since this delivery system actually doesn’t altogether eliminate the need to go to the market. They expect them to have some basics–and they still need to shop for other items, like toilet paper, dog food, laundry soap, milk, yogurt, bottled water, ice cream, and wine on a regular basis, so where is the benefit?

ingredients spread out

Unlike the service provided by a personal chef, the “easy prep but delivered to your door” services do NOT customize recipes to the customer’s wants and needs, and the customer must still prep, assemble, and clean up after each dish is prepared at the end of a busy and often stressful workday. Adding to the stress, sometimes the recipes don’t work. Where is the benefit?

The other new kid in town is something described as “Uber for private chefs”…

OK, I’m curious, so I asked the person who called to say they would be supplying clients for all of our chefs in the new future, what Uber for private chefs was, and was he certain he meant private chefs?

It quickly became clear he did not know the difference between private and personal chefs, but he made it clear he didn’t care about knowing what that difference was.

His premise for the business is to supply an app like Uber where a hungry client could go to the app and order a chef to immediately appear on command on site to prepare a meal…

I asked if these “chefs” were really trained chefs, whether they had business licenses, general liability insurance, culinary training, those kinds of fun things, but he said he couldn’t tell me any of that because it was secret. OK…secret…got it.

Next, we have the Airbnb version of the business. This time, the customer is able, through an app, to locate an individual in any city who is willing and purportedly capable of cooking them a meal that the client would go and enjoy in the cook’s home…

Some of these folks, who turned out to be home cooks of varying degrees of skill, have been calling APPCA wanting to get liability insurance through us. Apparently, the start up folks are directing them to us and telling them they can just call and we will cover them. It breaks my heart to turn them away because many of them are truly earnest in their desire to cook for clients, but most of them have no sanitation training, no training at all, no business licenses, no inkling of local regulations and licensing requirements. Someone is going to get hurt or get sick. I could not glean any criteria they must meet to protect the clients that use their service.

I know the internet was supposed to simplify our lives, but this does not appear to be well thought out.

Not everything we do needs to be ordered up on an app, and if all of those fun Silicon Valley start up geniuses are going to continue to create business apps, I wish they would make certain that the business is well conceived, provides a genuine service to the potential customer, and is safe and legitimate.

I know the Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, and easy prep instant delivery concept is exploding but the “right now” system isn’t automatically “right” for everyone. And, especially, when it comes to food preparation, the public needs to be careful about who is making their meals, what kinds of ingredients they’re using, how much–if any–expertise they have in meeting special needs diets, and, most important, how well trained they are in food safety.

laid back - business2

So, be very proud of the custom services you offer as personal chefs. You are trained, scratch cooks with
municipal business licenses, safe food handling certifications, and you are carrying $2 million in specific personal chef general liability insurance coverage. The service you provide regular clients is custom designed and palate specific to each client’s wants and needs, including meals specific to a client’s medical challenges. All of the meals are prepared from scratch using only the freshest and safest ingredients available in your locality. We can promise our clients a safe food source.

As personal chefs, you do the shopping for fresh provisions daily and prepare delicious custom designed meals either in the safety of the client’s kitchen or in a licensed, inspected commercial kitchen.

Personal chefs truly provide convenience, delicious custom designed meals, and a degree of personal service and attention to the client’s preferences and desired level of culinary expertise seldom experienced outside the services of a full time private chef.

Let’s see how the new services on the block hold up or evolve…this should be fun to watch.

Personal Chefs ROCK!!!

Have clients been talking to you about these easy prep services? What are you telling them?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Rainbow Swiss Chard, The Morning Star Ranch3

If you’re working with clients who have type 2 diabetes, hopefully you’ve consulted with nutritionists and learned what a well rounded diet is to keep them healthy and happy. All the experts say the best foods for T2 diabetics—the “free” foods—are the green foods. Lettuces, kale, Swiss chard, broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, and the like. This isn’t to say they shouldn’t eat carrots, squashes, beets, string beans, radishes, sweet potatoes, or other vegetables. They absolutely should eat a rainbow of vegetables to get all the nutritional benefits. But many—like carrots, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes—have higher carb counts so they can’t enjoy a free for all with them.

But if you think vegetables, especially greens = salad, stir fry, steaming, or boiling but nothing more imaginative, you couldn’t be more wrong. Here are some alternatives to the same old, same old.

Warm Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpea Salad

Carol Borchardt’s Warm Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpea Salad

Roasting vegetables could become your best weapon to beat veggie boredom. Your client may wince at the thought of eating Brussels sprouts, for instance, but roasting them brings out a whole other set of caramelized flavors. You can do the same with baby artichoke hearts in the spring and summer—just strip off the outer leaves till the light green ones appear. Broccoli, string beans, and asparagus also benefit from roasting, as does cauliflower. In fact, you can make “steaks” with cauliflower. Cut the head into thick slices, rub with olive oil and herbs, and roast. Red bell peppers are terrific roasted, skinned, then marinated in olive oil, herbs, and salt for an appetizer. Try steaming, then marinating eggplant in olive oil and garlic for an appetizer.

Mushroom Barley Soup

Mushroom Barley Soup

Soup can be a terrific way to eat greens. Add Swiss chard or kale to a mushroom barley soup or bowl of lentils. Or feature greens in its own soup. Don’t love the texture of broccoli? Want to change up asparagus? Chop it up and place it in a pot with low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock just to cover and a couple of chopped red potatoes. Add herbs, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the vegetables are softened. Then either put the mixture in a blender or use a stick blender to create your own low-cal, low-carb creamy soup.

In the heat of the summer make a chunky gazpacho soup. Nothing could be better for you nutritionally and it’s packed with the bright flavors of tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, chiles, cilantro, and garlic. Want some protein with it? Add roasted shrimp or fresh crab.

Use greens as wraps instead of bread. It works at In ‘N Out. It’ll work for you. Slice roasted chicken or turkey, add some marinated veggies or pickles, wrap in Romaine and you’ve got a crunchy “sandwich.”

One of my favorite dishes to teach to kids in the kitchen is zucchini pancakes. But what we always do is list off other vegetables you can make the focus of pancakes. How about spinach or other greens? Or carrots? Or broccoli? Or turnips? Or a combination of favorites? The key is to shred them so they’ll incorporate into a pancake.

Zucchini Pancakes

Zucchini Pancakes

Are you clients missing potato chips? Try kale and Swiss chard chips. Here’s a way to mix your greens and get your crunch. Wash and thoroughly dry the greens. Then strip leaves from the tough ribs and roughly chop the leaves. Toss with a little extra virgin olive oil, salt, and pepper. Spread out on a baking sheet and bake at 275 degrees until crisp.

You know you can sub spaghetti squash or spiralize zucchini for pasta. But what about a substitute for rice or couscous? Cauliflower comes to the rescue. This is a neat trick I learned. Cut up the florets, putting aside the stems to snack on. Then put the florets into a food processor and pulse, pulse, pulse until the pieces look like little grains of rice. (Be careful that you don’t just run the food processor and it turns to mush.) You can use it raw, like a grain, tossed in a green salad. Or sauté the “cauliflower rice” in a little oil, then top it with tomato sauce for an extremely low-carb dish. You can freeze the raw “rice” to use later.

And don’t forget the smoothie. Most people assume smoothies are fruit based, but I like to mix it up with spinach and low-carb berries (frozen in the off season)—and a little banana. This is a perfect breakfast and for someone trying to make sure the day doesn’t go by without vegetables, you’ll know at minimum you packed in a couple of cups first thing in the morning.

How do you make sure your diabetic clients get enough greens? Share your favorite dishes!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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