Do you have an adult child, niece or nephew, grandchild, or young friend just starting out in an independent life? Hopefully that young person has at least some foundation in cooking for her or himself, but who couldn’t use a great cookbook, a food bible to turn to? Think back, chefs. It’s probably something you had and cherished–and learned to cook with.

Now that college graduations are a recent memory and the grads are going to be on their own–not to mention the college students moving into their first apartments–wouldn’t the gift of a cookbook be a great thing to surprise them with?

Need some inspiration? I got suggestions from a number of chefs on our APPCA Facebook group:

  • How to Cook Without a Book by Pamela Anderson
  • The Flavor Bible by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (From Chef Anthony Caldwell: It teaches about developing flavors which is soooooo important!)
  • Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker
  • The Betty Crocker Cookbook in hardcover or the Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook (From Chef Lola Dee: For budding chefs, these are great go to’s to make just about any basic recipe. I’ve had them on my bookshelf all my life and still find myself looking there for certain recipes. They also have a whole section on cuts of meat, and what temperatures to prepare them at.)
  • The 1942 edition of Fanny Farmer Cookbook, the Betty Crocker Cookbook-2nd edition, and The Young Chef from the CIA (From James Haley: I am teaching my sons to cook. I started them off with The Young Chef by the CIA.)
  • The Whole30 Fast and Easy Cookbook by Melissa Hartwig (From Chef Suzy Dannette Hegglin-Brown: … because it is. And kids today do not like to cook.)

  • The New Best Recipe by Cook’s Illustrated
  • The Food Lab by J. Kenji López-Alt (From Chef Cliff Chambers: Easy read. Focuses on Culinary Fundaments, which many forget as we progress in the field.)
  • How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman
  • How to Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman

Now to the naysayers who say that young people don’t cook, I say they need a better introduction to being self sufficient in the kitchen. Maybe it won’t take at age 21 or at all–and down the road they’ll be clients of yours. Of course, cooking isn’t for everybody. But maybe you will inspire them. Cooking’s a skill that represents independence, that can help economize when they’re just starting out, and could turn into a joyful endeavor that gives them respite in an increasingly crazy world. It’s worth a try and worth sharing your passion in the hopes that it will become theirs.

If you could inspire a young person with a cookbook, what would it be? What is your favorite cookbook?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Glazed Duck Breast

Filed under: Catering,Recipes , Tags: , , , — Author: Caron Golden , June 12, 2018

Hey, chefs, are you catering dinner parties? If so, I came across a divine dish you’ll want to incorporate into your offerings. This Glazed Duck Breast is being made by the young chef of a San Diego restaurant called Cloak & Petal (a place you’ll want to visit next time you visit). For this dish chef Dominic Valenzuela created a yuzu marmalade for the glaze, and sits it in a swirl of potato puree, accompanied by confit turnips. Feel free to substitute the puree with a seasonal vegetable puree.

The first thing you’ll do is brine the two skinned and boned duck breasts in one quart of water mixed with a tablespoon each of salt and sugar. Valenzuela pointed out that this simple brine works just as well for chicken and pork. Note that the duck breast is skinned but still has a nice layer of fat on it. You’ll trim the excess fat–but, Valenzuela suggested, keep the excess to render and then cook scrambled eggs or sauté vegetables. Score the fat and place the breasts in the brine. You can brine it for a couple of hours or up to overnight.

Once the duck breasts have been brined, pre-heat the oven to 500° and score the breasts to help render the fat for crispness. Heat a skillet, preferably aluminum, cast iron, or stainless steel–not non-stick, and once it’s smoking hot, add a little melted butter or ghee or even vegetable oil to the pan.

Lay the duck breasts fat side down on the skillet and cook for about a minute and a half. Sprinkle some ground black pepper onto the breasts before turning them and cooking for another minute. Then flip them again and place the skillet into the oven for 7 to 8 minutes for medium rare (think of duck as meat, not poultry). Add or subtract cooking time in 2-minute increments for rare or for medium to well done. Remove the skillet from the oven and let the breasts rest for 3 to 5 minutes, tented with foil.To make the puree, dice and boil the potatoes until tender. Remove from heat and drain. Place in a blender with 2 teaspoons of salt and about 1 1 /4 cup of heavy cream. Puree, then pour into a bowl with a sieve to remove any lumps and make impeccably smooth. It reminded me of the texture of mayonnaise. Valenzuela explained that the puree can be made in advance and reheated in a pan with a little butter.


Valenzuela then sautéed mizuna, a Japanese green (you can substitute with other favorite greens), in butter, adding a splash of sake and lemon juice for flavor. He also placed his yuzu marmalade in a pan and added ponzu and unsalted butter to create the glaze, swirling it around to warm it until it reach a boil, at which point he took it off the heat.

Now comes time to plate. First place a mound of puree on the plate and using the back of a large spoon, push it into a swirl. Place the greens in the center. Then slice each duck breast and (tip) place on a paper towel first to drain the released liquid before placing on the puree, crispy side up on each plate, fanned out. Finally, spoon the glaze over the duck. Valenzuela then garnished the dish with cilantro oil and edible flowers.

Glazed Duck Breast
from Dominic Valenzuela of Clock & Petal
Serves 2

Ingredients
For duck
1 quart water
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 duck breasts, skinned and boned
1 tablespoon melted butter, ghee, or vegetable oil

For potato puree
2 russet potatoes, peeled
Ground pepper to taste
2 teaspoons salt
1 1/4 heavy cream

For greens
1 tablespoon butter or oil
2 cups mizuna or other greens
Sake
Lemon juice

For glaze
1/4 cup marmalade
1 ounce ponzu
2 tablespoons butter

Directions

Mix together water, salt, and sugar. Score the fat on the duck breasts and add them to the brine, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for one to two hours or as long as overnight.

Do a large dice of the potatoes and add to a pot with enough water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook until potatoes are tender. Drain and add potatoes to a blender bowl. Add 2 teaspoons salt and 1 1/4 cup of heavy cream. Puree.

Place a sieve over a bowl and pour the potato puree onto the sieve. Press through into the bowl. Set aside the puree.

Pre-heat oven to 500°. Remove the duck breasts from the brine. Heat a skillet until it’s smoking. Add melted butter and lay each breast fat side down and away from you onto the pan. Sprinkle some ground pepper on each breast and let cook for 1 1/2 minutes. Turn over and leave for another minute. Flip again and place in the oven for 7 to 8 minutes for medium rare. Add or subtract cooking time in 2-minute increments for rare or for medium to well done. Remove the skillet from the oven and let the breasts rest for 3 to 5 minutes, tented with foil.

While the breasts rest, sauté the greens in a tablespoon of butter or oil. Add a splash of sake and lemon juice. Once the greens have cooked, remove from heat.

Make the glaze by adding 1/4 cup of marmalade, an ounce of ponzu, and 2 tablespoons butter to a warm pan. Swirl around to keep the butter from breaking. Once it reaches a boil, remove from heat.

To plate, place a mound of puree on a plate and, using the back of a large spoon, swirl it around. Place the cooked greens in the center. Slice the duck and place on a paper towel to drain the liquid, then fan the slices of each breast onto each plate. Spoon the glaze over the duck.

Do you cook with duck for clients? What’s your favorite duck dish?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Carrot radishes

It’s just shy of official summertime but in San Diego the days are still balmy and on a recent weekend it was virtually required to make a visit to the farmers market.

Now, I recognize that in this part of the country with year-round growing seasons there’s no bad time to visit a local farmers market. But there’s something about late spring/early summer when the colors of produce are most vibrant and foods your body has been craving for months are now appearing. Look! Cherries! Oh, fava beans! No, over here, green garlic!

Fava beans

At one of my favorite markets, the Little Italy Mercato, which climbs up a slight hill to overlook the San Diego Bay, it was overwhelming to see all the brilliant colors of fruits and vegetables. I’m sure that wherever you live and cook for clients you have a market that’s this special. Are you going? No? How come?

Reed avocado, green garlic, chicken eggs

At my market today, I learned how to enjoy softball size, round Reed avocados. I bought my favorite eggs from a family of farmers I’ve known for years and learned one of the daughters is getting married this summer. Another farmer pointed out the relative timeline for how long different varieties of cherries he was selling would last. Still another farmer gave me ideas for how to enjoy the unusual carrot radishes he had and how he came to grow them.

So, what would otherwise be an anonymous shopping errand at a grocery store instead turned into a social event and several learning moments. I was out in the fresh air. I was walking. My senses were stimulated. It was really more of an adventure than fulfilling a basic necessity of buying food. And, I was supporting my local food community.

Yes, it’s probably more expensive to buy produce at a farmers market. But I’m guessing I’m buying more judiciously and wasting less food. And it’s fresh! It hasn’t been force ripened with chemicals. It didn’t travel more than 100 miles from the farm–and actually, the mileage would be much less, knowing the farmers I bought from.

So, if you’ve been on the fence about shopping at your local farmers market–or got out of the habit over winter–jump back in. You’ll have a wonderful experience, your farmers will earn needed income, and your clients will eat better!

French breakfast radishes

Now among my purchases were two types of radishes: the carrot radishes and red and white French breakfast radishes. Sure you can eat them out of hand, slice them into salads or pickle them–but how about roasting them?

Roasting radishes is easy and quick. You don’t even need a recipe. Just a bunch of radishes (or more, depending on how many people you’re serving), extra virgin olive oil, sea salt, ground pepper, and your favorite herbs or green onions.

Here we go:

1. Separate the radishes from the greens and set the greens aside.
2. Wash the radishes and trim them, leaving a bit of stem on top.
3. Pre-heat the oven to 450° F.
4. Once the radishes are dry, slice in half lengthwise, then place in a bowl and toss with extra virgin olive oil, sea salt, and ground pepper.
5. Place cut side down in a cast iron pan and roast for 13 minutes.
6. While the radishes are roasting, slice a green onion or mince parsley or other herbs.
7. Remove the radishes from the oven. Plate and sprinkle with the herbs. Eat right away. They’re best hot.

Are you a big farmers market shopper? What are your favorite kinds of purchases?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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There are times when we get so tripped up in the nomenclature we forget that diets stressing vegetarian or vegan practices embrace dishes we already create or eat. Instead we think of them as eliminating something–in the case of vegetarianism it’s meat, of course–and not bringing something absolutely delicious to the table. Dishes already in our considerable repertoire.

Knowing that not everyone in my circle eats meat–and that I, while an omnivore, have cut down substantially on meat–I turn to dishes that feature vegetables combined with other proteins. But, admittedly, I don’t really think of them that way. It’s vegetarian, just food I enjoy. Dishes like eggplant soufflé. Salads and sides with ancient grains.

And spanakopita.

Mediterranean cuisines in particular are great sources of beloved everyday dishes that happen to fall into the vegetarian category. As chefs you’re already well are of them. Spanakopita is one of my favorites–big greens, almost always spinach, combined with cheese and herbs and eggs, enveloped in a crunchy crust of phyllo. It’s impossible not to love this dish. And, for personal chefs who will freeze portions for clients to reheat, it’s a perfect freezer candidate. I always store my leftovers in the freezer and reheat individual slices in the oven or toaster oven.

Spanakopita is also the perfect entertaining dish. It’s like a casserole–only prettier. The two challenges, of course, are cooking down the greens–I do it in batches using a wok to take advantage of its depth–and working with phyllo. Brushing the phyllo with oil or melted butter and layering it repeatedly is a bit time consuming but not a deal breaker. Just remember to keep the phyllo, which has a tendency to dry out, covered with a damp towel when you aren’t pulling off a sheet.

While traditionally, spanakopita is made with spinach, there’s no reason you can’t substitute the spinach with other greens like kale or Swiss chard. Or combine them. Take advantage, especially in spring and summer, of bright herbs like mint and dill, and earthier herbs like Greek oregano. Add a unique spin to onion by using leeks instead. You could also include sliced kalamata olives or artichoke hearts to make the recipe your own. Just be sure that the greens and other additions are drained of as much liquid as possible before you mix them with the eggs, feta, and seasonings. Otherwise you’ll get a soggy bottom.

Spanakopita
Serves 8 to 12

You have a choice of olive oil versus melted butter to brush the phyllo leaves. I used olive oil but butter will add a rich flavor to it. And a tip here: Cooking down 2 pounds of spinach requires some skillet space. I use my wok because it gives me the cooking elbow room it needs. This part also just takes the most time. Once that’s done the rest will go by fairly quickly, even with the phyllo. Don’t worry about tears in the phyllo. It’s all very forgiving, thanks to all the layers.

Ingredients
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, preferably Greek, or melted butter, plus a lot extra for brushing filo
3 leeks, white and light green parts, chopped and rinsed
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds fresh spinach or other greens, well rinsed and dried
1 teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ pound Greek feta cheese, crumbled or diced
½ cup fresh dill weed, minced
½ cup fresh mint, minced
¼ cup fresh oregano, minced
5 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 pound phyllo, defrosted overnight in refrigerator

Directions
Preheat oven to 375° and place rack in middle of oven.

In a large skillet, heat oil or butter over medium-high heat. Add leeks and garlic and sauté until fragrant and soft, about 4 minutes. Add spinach in handfuls, stirring in as you add each batch. Let it wilt and cook down before adding the next handful. Once all of the spinach is in the pan, season with salt and pepper.

Remove from heat and spoon mixture into a colander. Place over sink and, using the back of a large spoon, press down to release excess liquid. Set aside to cool.

Once spinach mixture is at room temperature, add feta cheese, dill, mint, oregano, and eggs. Fold together until well incorporated. Set aside.

Brush the bottom and sides of a 9”-by-13” baking dish with olive oil. Keep ½ cup of olive oil (or melted butter) nearby. Unroll the phyllo and lay flat. Carefully pull the top sheet and place it into the baking dish with ends hanging well over the sides. Brush lightly with oil. Continue placing sheets one at a time into the dish at different angles so the entire pan is lined with sheet ends hanging down over the sides. Do this until you have only 3 sheets left.

Pour the filling into the dish, then fold over the hanging ends to cover the filling and brush with oil. Layer the remaining 3 sheets on top, brushing each sheet with oil. Fold the excess into the sides of the pan.

Use a sharp knife to cut through the layers to the filling in a few place. Brush the top with oil or butter and bake for 50 minutes until the top is puffed and golden brown. Let sit on counter for 10 minutes. Then cut into squares and serve warm.

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APPCA members never fail to amaze me. It’s so exciting to read both our website forums and our Facebook business and group pages to learn about how creatively you’re running your businesses and marketing them. So, I when I saw that Anne Blankenship of Designed Cuisine in Dallas recently had a radio interview experience I wanted to learn more–and figured you would, too. Not only did Anne come through with her story about the interview, she has included a wealth of great tips on preparing for it and–even more important–serving it up as a way to promote her business. You’ll want to take notes!

Recently I was contacted by a company called All Business Media FM, which is a subsidiary of I Heart Radio. At first I was skeptical, since I receive so many “spam” calls on a daily basis. My philosophy is “if they don’t leave a message, it’s not important.

But I did receive a voice mail from this company and it sounded fairly legitimate so I returned their call. When I spoke to the lady I queried her with my usual questions to verify their intent/legitimacy. How did you find me? Why did you select me/my business? And most importantly, “How much is this going to cost me?” She was a “fast-talking New Yorker” (apologies to all of you in the NYC area!) but as I listened, she was able to answer my questions. She said that she had visited my website (and cited some sample menu items I have listed) and had seen the reviews on my business on Google and Facebook, so I felt comfortable that she had at least done some research on me and wasn’t just a “scam artist.” She was very honest about the fact that there would be a follow-up call and that it would probably involve a marketing pitch, although there was no obligation after the interview.

The company specializes in small businesses and since I am not only an entrepreneur but a female in what is still (unfortunately) a fairly male-dominated profession of being a chef, this was an “enhancement” for them contacting me and wanting to do an interview. Once I said “yes” she put me through to their scheduling department and we verified all of my information and e-mail address. We scheduled a date and they sent four questions to me via e-mail that I answered and returned to them prior to the show. She had given me information about the fact that it would be an eight-minute interview, who my host would be on that day, and how to retrieve the interview afterwards from their website so I could post it on social media.

I created an “event” on my business Facebook page so everyone could see when the interview would be and posted the information on my personal Facebook page as well, since I knew some of my friends would listen in. In addition, I took the time to listen to a few of their other live interviews to get a feel for what would be the experience. I happened to listen to a woman who is a massage therapist and focused on Reiki as well, which was interesting to me, so I ended up listening to the whole eight minutes.

To prepare for my interview I reviewed the answers to the questions they had sent me and highlighted some important points. I knew it would go quickly and having been in Toastmasters at one time, I also knew the importance of no slang, no “uhs, ers, and ums,” as well as not starting sentences with “OK” and “So.”

They called me at the set time and the host chatted briefly with me about some simple instructions. I was nervous but truly most of the information is in my head since I’m always ready with the “elevator speech” and how to condense what I do in a few short paragraphs. Although I repeated myself a few times, overall it went well and they were very complimentary (which I’m sure they tell everyone!) A week later I was able to retrieve the interview and posted it everywhere on social media, as well as sent the link via e-mail to clients, friends, and family. (You can listen to it here.)

My joke with everyone was “Well, I got through my radio interview and at least I didn’t use the “F” word – except for “Food!” It’s just one more thing to be able to add to my repertoire of marketing tools. The power of social media is amazing and the more you can post in various places, the more your traffic will increase. I have had my website for some time, but constantly review and try to change something on it at least once a month (new menu items, videos, this radio interview link, etc.) I have also created accounts everywhere in the name of my business, “Designed Cuisine, A Personal Chef Service.” This includes Facebook, Instagram, Google, Yelp, and as “Anne Blankenship” on LinkedIn. I review my traffic every week on all of these entities and have seen it increase dramatically in the past two years, thanks to consistent postings.

I thought no one really listened to the radio much anymore, but Caron Golden pointed out that podcasts are a huge thing now (something I had totally forgotten) so doing this radio interview and promoting it through social media is a terrific way to keep “oiling that marketing machine.”

What kind of marketing are you doing to promote your business? Do you have a gap you need help with?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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We all know the frustration of preparing a dish and making various components for it, only to have leftovers. We all hate waste, but what do you do with that extra squidge of tomato sauce or pie filling? Well, APPCA member Chef Jim Huff of Traveling Culinary Artist in New York City has a lot of thoughts about this–and some marvelous tips. Here he is with them: 

Recently my baking sous-chef, aka my wife, and I made a delicious and easy Meyer Lemon Tart—from this recipe: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/lazy-marys-lemon-tart and had extra filling after topping off  our tart shell. I wasn’t about to toss it so I grabbed a handful of Trader Joe’s Meyer Lemon Wafer cookies and crumbled them into the bottom of a ramekin. I should have added melted butter to them but time was of the essence. We baked the ramekin along with the tart, then cooled the tart and the ramekin in the fridge overnight. When I took the ramekin out for lunch dessert I realized that during the baking process the cookie crumbs in the ramekin rose to the top and the filling baked underneath the crumbs! It was Awesome!!! I couldn’t stop eating it!

This successful spur-of-the-moment rescue of otherwise wasted ingredients got me to thinking about other ways I work with “overruns.”  BTW the term overruns is a throwback to my life in the garment industry!

Cooking for two can be challenging when you try cutting recipes from 4 to 6 servings, so very often you are left with extra ingredients that you had to purchase due to packaging sizes. The best examples are canned beans, canned tomatoes, tomato sauce, etc.

Of course it’s often easier to make the dish to the full amount of servings and then store it for another meal.  After all as a personal chef, that is what I do for my clients.  But sometimes I want to try new recipes and increase the variety of what we consume in a given week. Hence, leftover ingredients…

Some examples of how I use up the bits and pieces:

  • Generally, it’s easy to use up lots of the bits and pieces in soups and stews and stir-fries.
  • A 1/2 a can of beans that have been rinsed and drained are often used the next night, added to a simple tossed salad or dropped into a quick soup using up other leftover raw and/or cooked vegetables. Also I frequently will add them another vegetable such as sautéed green beans or blanched broccoli.  Chickpeas are great in ratatouille.
  • Extra canned tomato products work great in soups and stews, even when not called for in the recipe.  It’s also good to use them as a base for a quick pan sauce.
  • One of the most obvious uses I learned as a child from my mother is the extra egg batter from making French toast: scramble it and add to the serving platter.

  • It’s always easier to imagine using up extra herbs by making pesto and freezing or even simply chopping and mixing with small amount of olive oil and freezing in ice cube trays to be added to soups, stews and sauces. Or mince garlic and stir the herbs and garlic with some sea salt. Spread on a tray and let dry for a few days to create a rub. (Bonus: your kitchen will smell divine!)
  • Half a bag of spinach or other greens can be chopped and stirred into rice pilaf, quinoa, or couscous as well as soups or stews. Once I was out of parsley that I wanted to add to some simple boiled new potatoes. I found the extra spinach in the fridge and tossed it into the pan of drained potatoes with butter and garlic for a colorful side dish.
  • When dealing with extra parts of fresh vegetables I often create a mélange of roasted vegetables and serve them over pasta, rice, quinoa, couscous or my wife will put them chilled over cottage cheese for her workday lunches.
  • A great way to finish off pieces of cheese along with other ends of the jar ingredients like sun-dried tomatoes, olives, artichoke hearts, etc. is to make pizza.  The combos are boundless.
  • We have always used up extra pie/tart fillings by baking them separately in ramekins with and without crusts.  Good for a quick individual dessert for lunch or afternoon tea. Do you have extra pie dough? Reshape the dough into a disc and freeze or roll it out and make tartlets in muffin tins or get out cookie cutters and make cookies sprinkled with sugar or sprinkles.

  • Buttermilk is always a challenge, as I have never been a fan of drinking a glass of it!  I push myself to use it up in salad dressings, sub for milk in baking muffins, quick breads or even bread machine recipes.
  • Have leftover cooked grains? Sure you could just reheat them but for more imaginative repurposing Google things like “Leftover Risotto.” You’ll get anything from Classic Arancini to Risotto Stuffed Mushrooms, or dig around in your own fridge and produce Risotto Fritters stuffed with mushrooms and cheese!

Of course, there are plenty of well-known uses for bits and pieces like Parmesan rinds in your slow simmering tomato sauce and leftover wine (an anomaly in my house) for pan sauces. It just takes a little creative thinking but it’s easy to find places to tuck the odds and ends into other dishes, sometimes adding some extra nutrition and flavor profiles along the way.

Let’s bring in more ideas! What are some of your favorite ways to repurpose “overruns?”

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

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Want Sustainable Meat? Try Rabbit

Filed under: Special Ingredients , Tags: , — Author: Caron Golden , May 7, 2018

Rabbit is one of those meats that has yet to find a place on a mainstream U.S. menu. While it’s more commonly found in European countries, like France and Spain, just try to find it in a supermarket in the States.

And yet, farm-raised rabbit is a lovely, mild meat and lends itself well to a variety of dishes—if you know how to treat it. Because it’s so lean, it needs moist heat. And, because it’s so lean, it’s very healthy. Some call it the true white meat.

Rabbits are commonly braised or stewed—because of their leanness. If you have a whole rabbit, you can stuff the cavity with spices, truss it, sear it in fat, and cook it in a roasting pan or tagine surrounded by mire poix, stock, and potatoes. Not unlike cooking a whole chicken.

You can also break down the body. Trim the hind legs like chicken quarters by following the line and breaking at the joint. Cut the rest—a rather bony rib cage and a saddle attached to the spine—by cutting away the rib cage to use for stock and then cutting the saddle in half along the spine. Braise the pieces stovetop with olives and pine nuts or in the oven with stock, red or white wine, beer/ale, or cider, accompanied by root vegetables, earthy mushrooms, sliced apples, citrus, or herbs. Or, as a winter dish, cook it in a crust of Dijon mustard and horseradish.

If you do buy a whole rabbit, be sure to keep the liver and whatever fat you get. You can stuff the fat back into the whole rabbit when you braise it. And the liver? It’s sublime sautéed in bacon fat and sliced. You can also add it to flavor gravy or make paté.

Because rabbit is so lean, you have to be careful about not overcooking it. Be sure to use a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the thigh. You want the temperature to reach no more than 145 to 150 degrees, then remove it from the heat and let it rest. The meat will continue to cook as it cools, and you should get a resting temperature of 160 to 165 degrees.

While braising is a virtually foolproof way to prepare and serve rabbit, don’t limit yourself to that; rabbit’s very versatile. How about making rabbit street tacos? This is a dish I learned from San Diego chef Karrie Hills. You can grill meaty legs outdoors or sear them on the stove and then finish them in the oven, flavoring them with the smoke from a cedar plank.

Once the rabbit legs are cooked, slice the meat from the bones and build your tacos with sliced avocado, cheese (Hills uses feta, but you can use whatever appeals to you), and pico de gallo. You’ll turn a conventional SoCal dish into something deliciously memorable and unique.

Rabbit Street Tacos

From Karrie Hills
Yield: 10 tacos

Ingredients
2, 8-ounce rabbit legs
1 tablespoon powdered galangal
1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons bacon fat
1 orange, quartered
½ yellow onion, peeled and sliced
5 to 6 whole peeled garlic cloves
5 dried red chiles
3 sprigs fresh oregano
4 tablespoons butter

Cedar plank
10 small corn tortillas

For Pico de Gallo
1 cup fresh tomatoes, chopped
¼ onion, diced
1 garlic clove, minced
¼ cup cilantro, chopped
½ jalapeño, seeded and chopped
Juice from 2 limes
Pinch of salt

1 avocado, sliced lengthwise—enough for each taco
¾ cup crumbled feta cheese

Combine the galangal, oregano, smoked paprika, salt, and pepper to make a rub. Pat dry the rabbit legs and apply the rub. Let set from 15 minutes to 4 hours in the refrigerator.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Melt the 3 tablespoons of bacon fat in a frying pan. Heat the pan over high heat until the fat is close to smoking. Reduce to medium heat and add the rabbit legs. Brown three to four minutes on each side and, using tongs, pick up the legs and brown the edges.

In a baking dish, create a bed of the quartered orange, onion, garlic cloves, red chiles, and oregano sprigs. Top with the rabbit legs. Top with butter and sprinkle with salt. Bake uncovered for 10 minutes, then cover and continue baking for 20 minutes or until the internal temperature is 145 to 150 degrees. Remove from the oven and let rest. The internal temperature should rise to 160 to 165 degrees.

While the rabbit is cooking, making the pico de gallo by combining all the ingredients.

Heat the cedar plank on the stovetop (you’ll need a gas stove to do this). Once it starts to smoke, place the rabbit on the plank and cover with foil to smoke while heating the tortillas. Melt more bacon fat or a neutral oil in a pan and sauté the tortillas.

Remove the rabbit from the cedar plank and pull the meat off the bones. Slice the meat (keep the bones to use for stock).

Make the taco by adding rabbit meat to the tortilla. Add a slice of avocado. Spoon on the pico de gallo, and top with crumbled feta. Garnish with cilantro.

Have you cooked with rabbit? What are your favorite dishes?

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Pan de sal. Who can resist these sweet, pillow-soft buns? They were my first introduction to Filipino food back in 1988 when I found them at a bakery in a little mall in the San Diego community of Mira Mesa. It took me too many years to seek out more. It wasn’t until about 2010 that I started thinking about this lovely cuisine, which somehow still eludes the mainstream. And that’s so odd, given the popularity of fusion and global cuisine. After all, Filipino food is nothing if not a clear global melting pot, embracing Southeast Asia, Latin, Chinese, American (we’re to thank for their love of canned foods), and native traditions. With a tropical climate, multiple languages, diverse geographical zones—including 7,000 islands—and more than 120 ethnic groups, the Philippines is bursting with a multitude of delicious food traditions.

Where Candy, Dennis, and I live in San Diego is one of the largest expat Filipino communities in the U.S. So, there’s plenty of opportunity to enjoy traditional Filipino food–and to shop for it. And now we’re seeing a new generation of Filipino-American chefs draw from their traditions to lend the ingredients and flavors to new dishes.

One of them is my friend Anthony Sinsay, who is currently the chef at a downtown restaurant called JSix (if you live in San Diego or come for a visit, I encourage you to go). I went to his kitchen one day to learn how to make a dish of his called Mussels Adobo. Now, as chefs you’ll probably appreciate one of his most important cooking techniques: conversing with his food. He says that this conversation helps you learn where your food is in the cooking process.

He had sautéed a sliced jalapeño, garlic, and onion–one of the best fragrances ever, of course. Then he added the ebony Prince Edward Island mussels to the pan. He stopped explaining what he was doing to me to listen.

“You’ll hear the mussels purge their water,” he said. “Then you know you need to add a little liquid to keep them moist.”

The dish, which would be divine for a dinner party for clients, is inspired by Sinsay’s mom. “She grew up in the southern part of the Luzon Island in the Philippines. She made this dish with chicken that would simmer in the adobo sauce. I like making it with mussels, but I had to add sugar to the adobo sauce recipe to compensate for the shortened cooking time. When you cook vinegar a long time it becomes sweet. This dish with mussels cooks so quickly I needed to add a sweetener.”

Sinsay’s Mussels Adobo is based on a traditional adobo sauce–soy sauce, vinegar, and water. Sinsay quickly whips up the sauce and sets it aside while he first sautés the vegetables, then adds the mussels. He mixes in the adobo sauce and covers the pan, cooking the mussels until they open. Then, in what takes the dish to a seductive level, Sinsay adds coconut cream and butter. That’s it. Oh, except for one more critical addition: grilled pan de sal, the addictive sweet white Filipino yeast bread. Just brush slices with olive oil and toast on a grill until crispy–then try not dunking them in the luscious mussels sauce. I dare you!

 

Mussels Adobo
From Anthony Sinsay
Serves 4

Adobe is the national dish of the Philippines and varies from region to region. This version is closest to the adobo I grew up with made by my mother from southern Luzon. The sauce is an acidic broth comprised of white distilled vinegar, soy sauce, and water. Cooked with onion, garlic, and jalapeño balancing sweet, umami, spicy, and salty. It’s finished with coconut cream and butter to enrich the flavor and texture. The Pan de Sal is a Filipino yeast-risen dough with a slight sweet flavor, contrary to what the name suggests. Garnish the mussels with chive spears and crispy garlic chips (slice the garlic thin, blanch, then fry).

Ingredients
3 ounces adobo sauce (see below for recipe)
1/2 ounce of olive and canola oil blend
1 jalapeño, sliced in rings (include seeds if you want more heat)
1 1/2 ounces yellow onion, sliced in rings
1 whole peeled garlic clove, minced
9 1/2 ounces mussels, cleaned
1 1/2 ounces coconut milk
1/2 ounces butter
.1 ounce fresh chives, sliced into 2-inch pieces
1 loaf pan de sal, sliced
Olive oil

For adobo sauce
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup distilled vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup water

Directions
1. Make adobo sauce: Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly until all sugar is dissolved. Set aside.
2.  Sauté the jalapeño, onion, and garlic clove in oil. Brush pan de sal slices with olive oil and grill.
3. Add the mussels and stir together.
4. Add the adobo sauce, stir together, and cover, cooking until the mussels open.
5. Remove lid and remove mussels from the heat. Stir in coconut cream and butter. Taste the sauce and add salt if necessary to balance the flavor.
6. Garnish with chives and garlic chips (optional). Serve with grilled pan de sal.

Have you ever tried or cooked Filipino food? What dishes are your or your clients’ favorites?

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Eggplant Onion Gratin

Filed under: Vegetarian , Tags: , — Author: Caron Golden , April 23, 2018

I’m guessing that many of you have clients who adore eggplant. They love the creamy texture you get when it’s cooked that can go anywhere from baba ganoush to eggplant parmesan to eggplant souffle. I’m no different. I love eggplant in its many incarnations and across world cuisines.

So a few springs ago I decided to turn it into a gratin. This is kind of a risky dish because eggplants are so mild in flavor that they can simply be overpowered by the other ingredients you pair with them. At first I thought I’d slice the eggplant very thin and stack the layers, alternating with cheese. But ultimately I decided to cube it and toss together the ingredients. Oregano is a great flavor partner with eggplant and I grow it in my garden, so that was a part of this experiment. So were onions. And garlic. And panko combined with my favorite Trader Joe’s grated parmesan romano combo. And goat cheese. Together they created the necessary creaminess plus a little tartness without being too overwhelming. Instead of using butter, I turned to a really nice extra virgin olive oil.

I poured the mixture into an 8 1/2-inch oval au gratin dish. At just under 2 1/2 cup volume, I figured I’d get about three servings. For clients you’ll want to double my recipe.

The dish is a little time consuming to make but not too labor intensive. I figured the eggplant should be pre-cooked to make sure it had a soft and lush texture by the end. The onions and garlic need to be sauteed to create sweetness. After that you just combine everything and put it in the oven until it’s bubbly and brown.

The result was just what I’d imagined–creamy and crunchy, with a bright flavor from the punch of oregano, sweetness from the onion and garlic, tartness from the goat cheese. That distinctive mild eggplantiness came through. I enjoyed the dish with a piece of roasted chicken. And I had leftovers–which were easy to reheat. In fact, you can make this dish for a client dinner party ahead of time and simply reheat it before serving.

Eggplant Onion Gratin
Serves 2 to 3 depending on your generosity

Ingredients
2 3/4 cups eggplant, cubed
2 tablespoons olive oil
pinch of salt
1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced
1/3 cup milk
1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/4 cup goat cheese

For topping:
Goat cheese
1/8 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/8 cup panko crumbs
Drizzle of olive oil

Directions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Toss eggplant with 2 teaspoons olive oil and a pinch of salt. Spread on a baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes until soft and just becoming brown.

While the eggplant is baking, saute the onion and garlic in olive oil (about a tablespoon or more). Don’t brown them. You just want them soft. Add the oregano and cook for another minute. Set aside.

Remove the eggplant from the oven and mix with the onions in a bowl. Add milk and cheeses. Mix well.

Coat the inside of a gratin dish with olive oil. Add the eggplant mixture. Dot with goat cheese. Combine the 1/8 cup parmesan cheese with the panko and evenly spread over the eggplant and goat cheese. Drizzle with olive oil.

Bake uncovered at 400 degrees for 25 minutes until brown and bubbly.

What are your favorite ways to prepare eggplant? Do you have a recipe you’d like to share here?

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As a personal chef your goal is to make your clients happy with food that not only tastes good but perhaps also addresses health issues they face.

But what do you do when their health issues conflict with yours? What if, like APPCA member Jennifer Zirkle, you have celiac disease and yet still make baked goods and dishes you can’t taste?

This is neither a small issue or a rare one. Think of all the people in your life with gluten allergies, seafood allergies, and other random food allergies. Just because someone’s a chef doesn’t mean they’re immune to them.

Chef Dakota Weiss of Sweetfin, an L.A.-based chain of fast casual poke shops, told Forbes back in 2016 that she can’t even touch fish without reacting. She explained that her throat will close up, her tongue gets itchy, and it gets difficult to speak. So, how does she do her job? When scaling fish she dons two sets of gloves and wraps a bandanna around her face so that a scale doesn’t fly into her eye. It’s not always successful and failure results in her eye swelling shut.

Celebrity chef Amanda Freitag discovered she has an intense allergy to hazelnuts. She told Cooking Light that she worked with her allergist to create a plan and gather the right tools. “On the set of Chopped, I’m a regular. They know about my allergy. Hazelnuts are never on set when I’m there. They’re not usually on set at all. Any guest judge appearances I make, I let them know before I come in that I’m allergic to hazelnuts. That’s my first step. Second step is to always have an EpiPen.”

APPCA member Christine Robinson has issues with green peppers and gluten. “I can take digestive enzymes for small amounts of wheat and we use an Italian non-GMO flour that does not cause me to react…we tell clients ahead of time that we use every color of pepper except for green bell, as I can’t taste it…in nearly 20 years no one has minded…”

Similarly APPCA member Shelby Wassel addresses her watermelon allergy by leaving it out of dishes. “It’s not a big deal, but I never offer watermelon, feta and mint salad to my clients as I’m allergic to watermelon! No one has ever missed it.”

If food allergies dog you, your first responsibility is to your health and well being. Here are four tips for staying safe while still making delicious meals for your clients:

  1. “Just do the best you can, protect yourself first and if you can get someone to help that you trust then have them help you out,” Zirkle advised. That could mean hiring an additional person with you to handle the ingredients you’re allergic to–not just for prepping, cooking, and packaging, but also shopping for the ingredients so you don’t have to handle them at all, tasting the dish, and even cleaning up.
  2. Carry Benadryl and at least one EpiPen on you at all times. Double up on gloves and wear a mask if you absolutely have to work with an ingredient you’re allergic to.
  3. Be honest with your clients. Let them know that you have specific allergies and can’t prepare dishes with those ingredients in them at all or unless someone else you bring in handles them. Ask that anything you’re allergic to that they may have in their kitchen either be removed or stored away and well labeled so you can avoid it.
  4. Depending on the level of your reaction following exposure, don’t even offer it. It’s not worth the potential medical emergency that could land you in the hospital or worse.

And, if food allergies are an issue for you, let that be an opening into turning your compassion for potential clients who may also have food restrictions into new business opportunities. It may lead to your developing a new set of recipes that compensate for the ingredients you can’t work with, a new culinary specialty, and even new segment of clients who will appreciate how your limitations mirror theirs.

Do you have a food allergy you’re dealing with when cooking for clients? How have you addressed it?

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